The JCS at the Millennium

By M, Robert | Journal of Canadian Studies, Fall 1998 | Go to article overview

The JCS at the Millennium


M, Robert, Journal of Canadian Studies


On the weekend of 25-26 September 1998, the newly constituted Editorial Board of the Journal of Canadian Studies met for a retreat at Massey College in Toronto. The objective of the retreat was essentially to position the JCS for the next millennium.

The JCS faces the typical challenges of an academic journal, whose existence has been made precarious by uncertain funding and rising costs, and the Board confronted these realities. We were gratified to have our SSHRC funding renewed recently and Trent University continues to provide generous support. The Board is determined to ensure the Journal's existence and to direct the Journal's energies in a re-focussed and relevant way.

The Journal's experience has reflected the interdisciplinary mission of Canadian Studies and the larger "Canada" project writ large. The Journal remains committed to the cause of "knowing ourselves," in T.H.B. Symons's memorable phrase. But the "ourselves" that we are trying to know has been and is changing in rapidly if not bewildering ways. We intend to track and analyse the changed Canadian project, to encourage, exhort and help the development of the appropriate interdisciplinary tools, concepts and approaches required to this end, and to explain and illustrate to ourselves and the world what it is that makes Canada unique.

What are the changing circumstances on which the Board wants the JCS to focus? Take, for example, Canada's "nationhood." What is the meaning of the Canadian "nation" at the end of the millennium? Is it Macdonald's "national dream"? Trudeau's vision of a bilingual and bicultural nation? There has been a steady questioning and unpacking of the idea of the two founding nations, an increasing uneasiness about the bilingualism project, a schizophrenia about the meaning of distinct society, a stunning expansion of Canada's ethnic mosaic, a remarkable political experiment in the North and an acceptance that aboriginal nationhood is an idea whose time has come. Canada can more easily be characterised as a multiple nation and it expresses a set of nationalisms. Is Canada the first post-modern nation? What is it that others see in us that they find attractive or interesting? We want to help to develop adequate tools and concepts to understand this multiple nation, and to assist the evolution of discourses and institutions - political and otherwise - to serve this emerging reality.

Canada's recent economic experience can be conceptualised in similar fashion. Indeed, what is the Canadian economy? The parade has passed on the national project surrounding Macdonald's National Policy, as a result of the West's political economic muscle, technological change and the national embracing of internationalisation and free trade. The West played the advance guard in disrupting the postwar Keynesian consensus around the welfare state. As deficits, taxes, regulations and Crown corporations dissolve, the notion of the "public" Canada disappears as well, to be replaced by. . ? In the place of earlier visions, what has emerged are northsouth trade flows, cross-border regional economic areas, and an internationalization so intense (and periodically perverse) that Canadian governments cannot seem to manage their domestic economies and currency (the latter is inherently valued at around US$. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The JCS at the Millennium
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.