U.N. Calls for Ending U.S. Embargo against Cuba

By Beaubien, Michael C. | The New Crisis, November 1998 | Go to article overview

U.N. Calls for Ending U.S. Embargo against Cuba


Beaubien, Michael C., The New Crisis


The United Nations has adopted a resolution urging an end to the United States' 38-year-old trade embargo with Fidel Castro's Cuba. The vote was 157 in favor and two against (Israel and the U.S.), with 12 abstaining.

The U.N. General Assembly took the action Oct. 14. The resolution urges countries to repeal as soon as possible laws and measures - such as the U.S.'s Helms-Burton Act - that adversely affect the sovereignty, free trade and navigation of other states.

The General Assembly's action targets the economic, commercial and financial embargo that the U.S. first imposed against Cuba on Oct. 19, 1960, and in recent years has strengthened. The resolution also requests that the U.N. secretary general - in consultation with the appropriate groups within the international organization -- prepare a report on ways to implement the resolution and submit it to the General Assembly at its 54th session.

Cuban Foreign Minister Roberto Rodaina Gonzalez introduced the draft resolution by saying: "Blind and deaf, the United States of America continues to ignore demands made by this assembly during six successive years to put an end to its long, harsh and merciless economic, commercial and financial war against Cuba."

Describing the U.S. embargo as harassment "by the mightiest power ever," Gonzalez said the United Nations has witnessed abusive pressures, blackmail and threats to foil related trade initiatives with Cuba. The U.S. blockade, a remnant of the Cold War, has caused numerous shortages for Cuba's 11 million people and greatly interfered with human development in Cuba. Gonzalez, however, noted that the U.S. policy has not been successful in toppling the Cuban revolution and inciting the people to rise against its leaders and the political and economic system they freely chose. He asked the General Assembly to be fair and demand the U.S. put an end to its cruel blockade.

A. Peter Burleigh, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, responded that year after year Fidel Castro's Communist Cuban government has manipulated concerns expressed by the U.N. in order to claim support for its repressive and failed policies. Rather than accept the mistaken premise of the resolution, the U.S. urged nations committed to democracy and human rights to join it in a multilateral effort to promote a peaceful democracy in Cuba. In addition to maintaining pressure on the Cuban government to change, the U.S. believes the Cuban people must be reached and that change must come from within.

Speaking on behalf of the European Union, Hans Peter Manz of Austria said his region's full cooperation with Cuba depends upon improvement in human rights and political freedom. The European Union deplored the detention of a number of people who have expressed their rights to freedom of expression and association in a non-violent manner. He urged Cuban authorities to liberate and fully integrate all prisoners of conscience into society.

The representative of Myanmar reminded the General Assembly of past efforts to end the U.S. embargo. Win Mra said that although the number of member nations calling for an end to the embargo has grown from 59 in 1992 to 157 this year (86 percent), the most recent vote "reminds us that the appeal of the international community is still being unheeded." He said it is highly regrettable that despite the will of the international community, the blockade continues.

Perhaps the strongest condemnation was offered by Khiyhosizi J. Jele of South Africa. He told the Assembly that maintaining the embargo has created the inescapable perception that the United States is bent on imposing its will on Cuba and other sovereign states. Jele said it is, therefore, critical for the international community to act with more vigor to end the blockade, which is blatantly violating the principles of sovereignty, freedom of international trade, navigation and all other basic norms governing international relations enshrined in the U.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.N. Calls for Ending U.S. Embargo against Cuba
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.