Women's Work Is Never Done: Comparative Studies in Care-Giving, Employment, and Social Policy Reform

By Batalova, Jeanne | Journal of Marriage and Family, August 2003 | Go to article overview

Women's Work Is Never Done: Comparative Studies in Care-Giving, Employment, and Social Policy Reform


Batalova, Jeanne, Journal of Marriage and Family


Women's Work Is Never Done: Comparative Studies in Care-Giving, Employment, and Social Policy Reform. Sylvia Bashevkin. (Ed.) New York: Routledge. 2002. 208 pp. ISBN 0-415-93481-8. $23.95 (paper).

Women's Work Is Never Done is an engaging feminist collection that advances our understanding of how welfare discourses and policies affect women as welfare recipients, caregivers, workers, and citizens. A number of contributions of this solid scholarship are worth mentioning. First, by providing a cross-national analysis of welfare regimes and their influences on women, the authors recognize the dynamic nature of welfare language and practices. Second, although the male-female differences in welfare experiences are well-documented, the contributors examine a diversity of experiences among women depending on their race, class, and age. Finally, throughout the volume the authors draw our attention to construction of citizenship in terms of who "deserves" to be considered a citizen and whether access to citizenship rights should be based on one's needs or one's societal contribution. Collectively, the contributors criticize the Moynihan report's stereotypical portrayal of African American women and contribution to the racialized construction of citizenship; the movement toward conservative family structures, in which women's interests are pushed aside; and the neoliberal practices and moralistic rhetorics of economic self-sufficiency and personal responsibility. A strong feature of the volume is that it offers alternative policy suggestions that could rectify the punitive organization of the current welfare systems and in the long-term advance gender equality.

The book is organized into four sections that allow readers to easily locate topics of interest. In the first section, "Conceptual Issues," Selma Sevenhuijsen, by using the ethic of care, makes care-giving visible in the state-market-family relation triangle. Also by looking at care from a power/conflict perspective, the author recognizes that "care can be debilitating and patronizing, as well as enabling and supportive" (p. 25). In the second section, "Confronting Women's Diversity," the contributing authors bring into focus diversity among women along race, class, and age lines in their experiences in welfare state regimes.

The third section, "Anglo-American Welfare Reform," examines differences and similarities in public discourses and policies on social assistance across a number of Anglo American welfare regimes. Using case study methods, the authors show that in the context of neoliberal economic restructuring, the four Commonwealth countries, with the United States in the vanguard, are shifting more toward marriage-oriented and market-based approaches to welfare that undermine the foundations of expansive social citizenship rights. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Women's Work Is Never Done: Comparative Studies in Care-Giving, Employment, and Social Policy Reform
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.