2003 Teachers of the Year

Journal of Correctional Education, September 2003 | Go to article overview

2003 Teachers of the Year


Region I

Bob Hansen received his Associate's Degree in Horticulture in 1967 from the State University at Farmingdale, his Bachelor's in Landscape Architecture in 1970 from the University of Georgia, completed his Master's in Regional Landscape Planning in 1972 at the University of Massachusetts. After graduation, he worked eight years doing environmental impact studies, primarily for highvoltage transmission lines. He then spent two years as an assistant landscape architect. In 1983, he took a position with the New York State Department of Corrections as a vocational horticulture instructor, where he remains. In addition to teaching in corrections, he has taught several courses in the adult education programs at BOCES. He also continues to practice as a landscape architect.

Mr. Hansen provides many special services through the facility to outside agencies such as churches, schools, and hospitals. In his personal time, he serves as President of the Lenape Volunteer Ambulance Corp., a volunteer organization providing life support for the community. He is First Aid, CPR, and AED instructor for LVAC. He has been an active member of the Rutgers Engine Company for 28 years, and is presently a director. Otisville Correctional Facility is proud to have Bob Hansen as a colleague and leader in his field and at the facility.

Region II

Mark Hedrick has taught in a correctional setting for 19 years. He began in 1984 at the former WV Penitentiary as a remedial reading and vocational math teacher in the Prison Industry Building. In 1986, he was hired by Marshall County Schools to fill the vacant GED teaching position at the penitentiary, a position he continues to hold though the WV Department of Education took over responsibility for education in correctional facilities in 1988. Aside from his current position as Adult Basic Education and Special Needs teacher at the Northern Regional Jail and Correctional Facility, Mark teaches adult education classes part-time for Ohio County Schools. He also teaches college English at NRJCF as adjunct professor for WV Northern Community College. He serves on the Board of Directors for WV Adult Education Association and is a State PEER trainer for newly hired correctional educators in West Virginia. Mark was named West Virginia Adult Education Association Adult Educator of the Year in 1989.

Mark was reared in Wheeling, WV and is a 1978 graduate of Linsly Military Institute. He was awarded a Bachelor of Arts in Education at West Liberty State College and Master of Arts in Special Education at WV University. Mark is continuing to further his education through Marshall University.

Mark and his wife Gina have two daughters. He enjoys coaching them in the many sports in which they are involved.

Region III

My career in the hair industry began at Ohio State School of Cosmetology in 1979. After completing the program and state board examinations, I received a Managing Cosmetology license. Immediately thereafter, I pursued barbering in the Ohio State College of Barber-Styling, and was licensed by the Ohio State Barber Board.

My primary focus is barbering , perhaps because of having spent 20 years in the industry as a barber-stylist and salon coordinator-a background which I feel uniquely qualifies me as a CTEA teacher.

In June of 1999, I joined the faculty at Richland Correctional Institution in Mansfield, Ohio, teaching vocational barbering. I prepare students in the basic competencies needed for licensure by the Ohio State Barber Board. Licensure, however, is not the only outcome stressed. The program also emphasizes business operation, planning, professionalism, shop management, and the importance of safety, in conformity with other industrial standards. Corrections education presents new and varied opportunities for professional growth. I find teaching a rewarding and fun experience. I look forward to a long career in correctional education. …

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