Climb Mount Niitaka!: The Japanese Fleet That Struck Pearl Harbor

By Thurman, Paul; Hemming, Oscar | Sea Classics, July 1999 | Go to article overview

Climb Mount Niitaka!: The Japanese Fleet That Struck Pearl Harbor


Thurman, Paul, Hemming, Oscar, Sea Classics


Renown for the stealth with which it daringly approached Pearl Harbor; the Imperial Japanese Navy strike armada, which brought the United States into the Pacific War on 7 December 1941, paid dearly for its treachery. That long ago `Day of Infamy' on 7 December 1941 will forever be remembered for the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, that brought about the United States formal entry into the Pacific War.

Shortly after 8 a.m. on that bright Sunday morning, two major waves totaling 353 Japanese torpedo and dive bombers, escorted by echelons of fighters, commenced successive air attacks that in a matter of hours all but destroyed the United States Pacific Fleet. All of America and the free world was shocked not only by the audacity of Japan's warlords, but at the appalling damage accomplished by naval strike aircraft. Of the 94 American ships in the harbor, 18 would be sunk - 6 of them battleships. Tragically, 3067 American servicemen were killed in the attack, more than 1100 of these lost on the battleship USS ARIZONA. Nearly 4000 soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and civilians, were injured.

A good morning's work for the Japanese, the American Pacific Fleet lay in fiery shambles as all but 29 of the Japanese planes returned in triumph to their carriers. History had been made. In a single blow the Japanese had successfully accomplished their aim of crippling the Pacific Fleet; paving the way for a fast and easy conquest of the Western Pacific. Once this was accomplished Japan would solidify its gains in Asia and be well on the road to world conquest with their Axis partners, Germany and Italy.

Regardless of one's perspective, the Japanese assault at Pearl Harbor had been brilliantly planned and flawlessly executed. A relatively small strike force of 33 ships, including six aircraft carriers, amazingly crept undetected across thousands of miles of ocean to launch its attack aircraft less than 200 miles north of Oahu. Escorted by two battleships, three cruisers and nine destroyers, the carriers not only suffered minimal losses to their air groups, but managed to escape American waters undetected. Absolute secrecy had been maintained despite the fact that British and American code-breakers had recently cracked Japanese diplomatic codes.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Climb Mount Niitaka!: The Japanese Fleet That Struck Pearl Harbor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.