Minority Recruitment and Retention Strategies in Physical Therapist Education Programs

By Splenser, Pablo E.; Canlas, H. Liza et al. | Journal of Physical Therapy Education, Spring 2003 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Minority Recruitment and Retention Strategies in Physical Therapist Education Programs


Splenser, Pablo E., Canlas, H. Liza, Sanders, Barbara, Melzer, Barbara, Journal of Physical Therapy Education


Background and Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were direct relationships between: (1) the number of recruitment and retention strategies and the number of minority students who were accepted into, enrolled in, and graduated from a physical therapist education program and (2) the number of minority full-time faculty and the number of minority students who were accepted into, enrolled in, and graduated from a physical therapist education program. Subjects. The sample used for this research study consisted of 76 of 173 physical therapist programs in the United States accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) in 1999. Methods. The program director at each program surveyed completed a questionnaire. The responses served as the data utilized for this research study. Results. The results ivere analyzed using descriptive analysis and Pearson product moment correlations. More recruitment strategies was not significantly correlated (r=.210) with having more minority applicants. Number of minority recruitment strategies was not correlated with number of first-year minority students (r=.119). Retention strategies were correlated with a greater percentage of minority graduate students (r=382, P<.05). Special retention efforts also were significantly correlated with number of graduating minority students (r=.350, P<.01). There was a correlation between minority faculty and minority applications (r=.426, P<,01), although there was no correlation between number of minority faculty and number of first-year students (r=.173) and graduating minorities (r=.219). Discussion and Conclusion. The results indicate that physical therapist education programs: (1) are deficient in keeping ethnicity and racial data of minority applicants; (2) are deficient in keeping data related to the reasons why minorities fail to graduate; (3) have more minority applicants and minority graduates when utilizing special efforts to recruit and retain minorities, respectively; (4) have more minority graduates when using more retention strategies; and (5) have more minority applicants when having more minority full-time faculty.

Key Words: Minority students, Recruitment strategies, Retention strategies.

INTRODUCTION

Minority students are currently as underrepresented in physical therapy as they are in other health care professions.1-9 The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) defines the terms "minority" and "minorities" as members of racial and ethnic groups, identified as African American or black, Asian American, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, American Indian or Alaskan, and Hispanic or Latino.10 In this study, "student underrepresentation" for each ethnicity/race is defined was having a lower percentage of representation in the profession when compared with the percentage found for that ethnicity/race in the general US population. Although Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are not considered under-represented, they were included in this study for the purpose of comparing their current representation with the contrasting under-representation of the other minorities.6,8,11-13

Although the number of minority students in physical therapy programs has increased over the years, from 6% in 1990 to about 12.9% in 1999, this increase has been significantly slower than the increase of minorities in the general US population (MJ Harris, Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education [CAPTE] e-mail, March 1, 2000; E King, American Physical Therapy Association (APTAI, written communication, March 2000). The US Census Bureau predicted for the first years of the 21st century that 30% of the US population will be composed of minorities.5,10 Furthermore, by the year 2030, 40% of the population is expected to be composed of minorities.4 Thus, a logical expectation is that the percentage of minority physical therapist students should closely mirror the percentage of minorities in the general US population.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Minority Recruitment and Retention Strategies in Physical Therapist Education Programs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?