Chronology: Iran

The Middle East Journal, Summer 1999 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Iran


1999

Jan. 18: Ayatollah `Ali Khamene'i called for an end to factionalism after unidentified assailants killed a prominent engineer and his wife and the wife of a translator in their homes in Tehran, the previous week. [1/19 WP]

Jan. 19: Ataollah Mohajerani, the minister of culture, demanded a public apology from `Ali Larijani, the head of the state radio and television network, and banned him from attending cabinet sessions for airing a broadcast that blamed President Muhammad Khatami's supporters for the murders of five dissident writers at the end of 1998. [1/20 WP]

Jan. 25: A US missile landed in Abadan, near the Iraqi border. [2/8 WP]

Jan. 29: The Iranian Atomic Energy Organization advertised for engineers to be trained in Moscow to operate the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear plant. [1/30 NYT]

Jan. 31: The Mujahidin-e Khalq (MKO) claimed responsibility for an explosion in northern Tehran. An MKO spokesman stated that the group had attacked offices of the intelligence ministry, while the Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) reported that the blast had smashed windows of a residential building. [2/1 NYT]

Feb. 1: Celebrations were held to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's return from exile. [2/2 NYT]

Feb. 7: `Ali Shamkhani, the defense minister, determined that the US missile that landed in Abadan on 25 January was an accident. [2/8 WP]

Feb. 9: Qorbanali Dorn-Najafabadi, the intelligence minister, resigned because it had been discovered that intelligence agents had been involved in the murders of dissidents. [2/10 NYT, FT, WP]

Feb. 10: Tehran radio reported that President Khatami had appointed `Ali Yunesi, the military prosecutor who had led the investigation that ended with the arrests of intelligence agents for dissidents' murders, as the new intelligence minister. [2/11 WP, 2/12 FBIS]

Feb. 11: Celebrations were held to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the collapse of Shah Muhammad Reza Pahlavi's government. [2/12 NYT, WP, 2/16 FBIS]

About 100 people attacked Hadi Khamene'i, Ayatollah Khamene'i's younger brother, at a mosque in Qom. The attackers were chanting, "Death to Khatami." [2/14 NYT, 2/16 FBIS]

Feb. 13: IRNA reported that, in Tehran, an unidentified assailant had killed a German bank official. [2/16 FBIS]

Feb. 18: IRNA reported that authorities had arrested 45 people in connection with the 11 February attack on Hadi Khamene'i. [2/19 NYT, FBIS]

Feb. 20: The supreme court overturned the death sentence given in January 1998 to German national Helmut Hofer, for having sexual relations with a Muslim woman, and ordered a retrial. [2/21 WP, 2/22 FBIS]

Feb. 21: Agence France Presse (AFP) reported that about 5,000 Iraqis living in Iran held a demonstration in Qom, denouncing Iraqi President Saddam Husayn's regime for the killing of Iraqi Shi'ite cleric Ayatollah Muhammad Sadiq al-Sadr. [2/22 FBIS]

Feb. 22: IRNA reported that the election board had disqualified 50 candidates from the 26 February local elections because their loyalty to Ayatollah Khamene'i was in question. [2/23 NYT]

Feb. 24: The Majlis approved `Ali Yunesi as the new intelligence minister. …

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