Book Reviews -- Nellie Bly: Daredevil, Reporter, Feminist by Brooke Kroeger

By Gottlieb, Agnes Hooper | Journalism History, Summer 1994 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- Nellie Bly: Daredevil, Reporter, Feminist by Brooke Kroeger


Gottlieb, Agnes Hooper, Journalism History


While journalist Brooke Kroeger's new biography of Nellie Bly does much to debunk the myths and legends surrounding the nineteenth century's celebrated stunt journalist, it also raises questions that remain unanswered because of the paucity of sources. But considering the blank space that used to be her story, this book does much to expose the real Bly to history.

Christened Elizabeth Cochran and affectionately called "Pink," she first added an "e" to her last name and then adopted the "Nellie Bly" sobriquet for practically all but her legal entanglements; she used "Nellie Bly" stationery and even signed letters "N.B" In this biography, Kroeger used dozens of magazine and newspaper articles written by and about Bly, peppered with the paltry primary evidence, to reconstruct the life story of the woman responsible for the age of stunt journalism.

In the process, the author exposes the flaws of Bly. Kroeger notes that she practiced a form of advocacy journalism that would be considered unethical today. She also failed initially as a columnist; she fled the country when she was charged with obstruction of justice; and she was an extremely litigious woman. She sued her mother as well as her guardian and her brother, among others. She spent all of World War I interred in Austria, and her passionate dislike of anything or anyone British encouraged her support of the Germans before the United States entered the war. Clearly, as Kroeger demonstrates, there was more to Bly than was previously remembered.

This is a much-needed book. The fact that there had never been a serious biography of arguably the most well-known woman journalist in America spoke poorly of the state of women in journalism history. That weakness has been bolstered by Kroeger's interesting and readable chronicle of the woman who raised stunt journalism to an art form when she spent ten days in a madhouse to expose the conditions on Blackwell Island in 1887. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- Nellie Bly: Daredevil, Reporter, Feminist by Brooke Kroeger
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.