A Decision Built on Deceit?

By Buchanan, Pat | The Human Life Review, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

A Decision Built on Deceit?


Buchanan, Pat, The Human Life Review


APPENDIX C

Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that created a woman's right to an abortion, was the most controversial of the last century. It divides us yet.

Any nominee to a federal appellate court or the Supreme Court who does not swear allegiance to Roe is disqualified in the eyes of the Democratic Party. To Democrats, ensuring a woman's right to abort her child has become a tenet of their party, a reason for its existence, an article of their faith.

But what if Roe vs. Wade was based on fraud, deceit and lies?

Comes now a woman who knows as surely as anyone whether that explosive charge is true. That is Jane Roe herself, the Texas woman whose plight and plea persuaded the high court to strike down every state law restricting a woman's right to abort her child.

Who was, and is, Jane Roe? She is Norma McCorvey, and she has just filed a petition in a Dallas federal court, as the litigant in Roe vs. Wade, to have the 1973 ruling overturned.

McCorvey contends that when she was a 21-year-old street person, she was ignorant of what abortion meant, made up her story about being raped, and was deceived and used by her lawyers. Those lawyers, McCorvey says, told her that the baby inside her was "tissue."

After Roe vs. Wade came down, McCorvey became the Rosa Parks of the feminist movement. And because of her fame, she was regularly offered jobs at the abortion mills. What she witnessed inside them changed her heart.

Here is an excerpt from the affidavit McCorvey just filed, describing what it was like in the "clinics" where she held the hands of women being aborted, as they dug their nails into her palm:

"But the most distressing room in the facility was the 'parts room.' Aborted babies were stored there. There were dead babies and baby parts stacked like cordwood. Some of the babies made it into buckets and others did not, and because of its disgusting features, no one ever cleaned the room. The stench was horrible. Plastic bags full of baby parts that were swimming in blood were tied up, stored in the room and picked up once a week.

"At another clinic, the dead babies were kept in a big white freezer full of dozens of jars, all full of baby parts, little tiny hands and feet visible through the jars, frozen in blood. The abortion clinic's personnel always referred to these dismembered babies as 'tissue.'"

This is a scene straight out of hell. Recoiling from it, in 1995, McCorvey became a Christian and resolved to do what she could to overturn the decision that has permitted 40 million unborn to be butchered, their tiny torn bodies discarded in the fashion described above.

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