Role of Sexual Abuse in the Etiology of Borderline Personality Disorder

By Strochak, Richard D. | American Journal of Psychotherapy, Summer 1999 | Go to article overview

Role of Sexual Abuse in the Etiology of Borderline Personality Disorder


Strochak, Richard D., American Journal of Psychotherapy


MARY C. ZANAMNI, ED.: Role of Sexual Abuse in the Etiology of Borderline Personality Disorder. American Psychiatric Press, Washington, DC, 1997, 247 pp., $40.00, ISBN 0-88048-496-9.

The forty-ninth book of the American Psychiatric Association's Progress in Psychiatry Series brings together eleven research studies in the area of childhood sexual abuse and the development of the Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). This research, formerly presented in various symposia at APA's annual meetings, represents "second generation studies" of environmental factors in borderline syndromes. Nine of these studies conclude, in general, that: 1. physical and sexual abuse are relatively common in the childhood experiences of borderline patients; 2. physical abuse is not reported more often in borderline groups than it is in control groups; 3. sexual abuse is reported significantly more often by borderline groups than by control groups.

The two remaining studies reported findings somewhat in opposition to the general theme that childhood sexual trauma is linked with BPD. In Chapter 6, Zweig-Frank and Paris report no relationship between childhood sexual abuse and dissociation. In this study, the authors found no differences on the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) between subjects with caretaker abuse and subjects with non-caretaker abuse, whereas in earlier studies caretaker abuse had been strongly linked with the presence of dissociative mechanisms. Another study in this volume also has a different perspective. In Chapter 9, Kimble et al. investigate the relationship between "neurological vulnerability" and trauma in borderlines. They present evidence that borderline patients were significantly more likely than control subjects to have evidence of some sort of neurological vulnerability. This vulnerability substrate includes maternal alcohol/drug abuse, one or more CNS insults, childhood seizure disorders, and developmental speech/language impairments. Their findings indicate that a vulnerable neurological substrate was a stronger predictor of BPD than was a reported history of childhood sexual abuse.

Mary C. Zanarini, the Director of the McLean Study of Adult Development and the Laboratory for the Study of Adult Development at McLean Hospital in Boston, was a good choice for editor of this book. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Role of Sexual Abuse in the Etiology of Borderline Personality Disorder
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.