CyberSource Announces Software.net

Information Today, January 1995 | Go to article overview

CyberSource Announces Software.net


Internet users can now browse, purchase, and retrieve software electronically through software.net, the world's first Internet-based electronic software channel, from CyberSource Corp. Building on the capabilities of the Internet's World Wide Web (WWW), software.net (pronounced "software dot net") allows users to easily maneuver through product information by pointing and clicking their mouse. To access software.net customers can use standard browsing software that allows them to navigate the WWW, such as the popular Mosaic browsers (URL-http://software.net).

Once there, customers are greeted with an array of easily retrievable information. From product reviews to software marketing materials, each piece of information is linked by keywords to ensure easy point-and-click access. Complementing these features, software.net provides a customer support staff to assist users in accessing the service and purchasing and downloading products.

When customers have decided on a product, they can enter their credit card information electronically or call software.net's toll free number to provide billing information. Customers can choose from over 6500 shrink-wrapped products for Windows, DOS, Macintosh, and UNIX platforms, and software.net will overnight any of these to the customer. In addition, software.net offers a growing selection of electronically deliverable titles from vendors including FTP Software, Inc., Gupta Corp., ON Technology Corp., and Symantec Corp. CyberSource is working with other publishers to convert their products for electronic distribution and plans to expand these offerings rapidly.

"The Internet provides an infrastructure to allow for the electronic distribution of virtually all software," says Bill McKiernan president of CyberSource Corp. …

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CyberSource Announces Software.net
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