Megamedia: How Giant Corporations Dominate Mass Media, Distort Competition, and Endanger Democracy

By Collins, Frances L. | Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Autumn 1999 | Go to article overview

Megamedia: How Giant Corporations Dominate Mass Media, Distort Competition, and Endanger Democracy


Collins, Frances L., Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly


Megamedia: How Giant Corporations Dominate Mass Media, Distort Competition, and Endanger Democracy. Dean Alger. Lanham, MD: Roman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 1998. 276 pp. $27.95 hbk.

Dean Alger doesn't mince words. The title of his book clearly reflects his opinion of the effects of media mergers and acquisitions on the quality of information available to today's media consumers. Alger notes that his book isn't a full-scale study of media conglomerate control, but it does provide an updated and detailed analysis of the problem, with a comprehensive bibliography of sources for further reading. His stated goal is "to provoke much more discussion and debate among [his] fellow professionals and, more important, in the mass media and among the general public."

Alger, who holds a doctoral degree in political science and was a fellow in the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, recently appeared in a Bill Moyers PBS special, discussing television news coverage of the 1996 Telecommunications Act. He noted that, during nine months of congressional debate on legislation to provide broadcasters new, free channels to help make the transition to digital capabilities, the three major broadcast news outlets aired a mere nineteen minutes of reporting on the issue.

Alger devotes considerably more time to this issue-an entire chapter-in which he reviews and analyzes the history of telecommunications legislation and the lack of any significant information provided to the public by the major broadcast news organizations, all of whom had a vested interest in the outcome of the congressional debate.

Other chapters explore the consequences of media conglomerate self-interest on democratic processes, the growth of media conglomerates outside the United States, and Alger's recommendations for addressing and redressing those consequences.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Megamedia: How Giant Corporations Dominate Mass Media, Distort Competition, and Endanger Democracy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.