Calif. Court OKs Race Admissions: Ruling Tailored for Experimental School to Conduct Research but Could Apply Elsewhere

By Egelko, Bob | Black Issues in Higher Education, September 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Calif. Court OKs Race Admissions: Ruling Tailored for Experimental School to Conduct Research but Could Apply Elsewhere


Egelko, Bob, Black Issues in Higher Education


Calif. Court OKs Race Admissions: Ruling tailored for experimental school to conduct research but could apply elsewhere

SAN FRANCISCO -- An experimental University of California-Los Angeles elementary school here that uses racial admissions to study learning skills survived another court test this month but still faces more legal challenges.

A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 that the Los Angeles school legally could deny admission to a 4-year-old Asian American girl because race is the basis of the school's research.

Although narrow in its scope, the ruling eventually could have broader impact in this racially diverse state because several colleges and universities have set up similar programs to help improve secondary education.

The University of California-San Diego established an elementary school this fall, for instance, to help boost the secondary education provided to low-income and minority students so that they can more easily get into top-flight universities.

In addition, California State Polytechnic University-Pomona, California State University-Dominguez Hills, Orange Coast College and several other colleges have so-called "middle colleges" -- high schools on college campuses for specialized student populations.

"This case has a lot to do with academic freedom and the right of researchers to establish the subject matter of their research without excessive governmental interference," Joseph D. Mandel, the University of California-Los Angeles' vice chancellor for legal affairs told the Los Angeles Times.

The case against the university was filed with the help of the Pacific Legal Foundation, a conservative group that has been at the lead in fighting numerous anti-affirmative action court cases here in the western United States.

Foundation attorney Sharon Browne warns the appeals court's ruling could lead to "more classrooms set up as educational experiments and racial quota systems set up to determine who is allowed in the classroom."

The child's lawyers say they will appeal to the full court. Her parents also have filed suit in Los Angeles County Superior Court under Proposition 209, the 1996 California initiative that bans race and sex preferences in state and local education, employment and contracting. The first lawsuit was based on federal civil rights law.

"The basis for their justifying doing research based on racial quotas is that there are differences in the way the races think," says James K.T. Hunter, the child's father, who is an attorney. "This is the first time any opinion will have been based on an assumption that the races think or learn differently."

Dennis Perluss, a lawyer for the school, contends that the research is valid and that it is based on numerous studies suggesting that "the fact of race has an impact on learning. What scholars are trying to figure out is why and how, and how do we overcome that. Starting with a 4-year-old is really the way to deal with the issue.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Calif. Court OKs Race Admissions: Ruling Tailored for Experimental School to Conduct Research but Could Apply Elsewhere
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.