Black People Resisted

By Bennett, Lerone | The New Crisis, September/October 1999 | Go to article overview

Black People Resisted


Bennett, Lerone, The New Crisis


They resisted the practice of slavery and the trade in slaves from its inception in the United States in the early 1600s to it end in the middie 1800s.

They resisted it on the ships from Africa.

They resisted it in the fields and in the big house; they resisted by organized rebellion; and they resisted by direct, spontaneous acts of courage.

For their freedom, they killed and were killed. They poisoned and committed infanticide and suicide. They always ran away. And some master was always hunting for them.

Their will set against the master's will, they fought, fought back, and died They also survived They took the lash and the burn. They lost but they won.

By the strength of their determination, Md by the North Star and set aboard the box cars of the Underground Railroad-by their resistance-slaves won in the cause of Human freedom.

Major Revolts and Escapes

1663

First serious slave conspiracy in Colonial America, Sept. 13. Servant betrayed plot of White servants and Black slaves in Gloucester County, Virginia.

1712

Slave revolt, New York, April 7. Nine Whites killed. Twenty-one slaves executed.

1730

Slave conspiracy discovered in Norfolk and Princess Anne counties, Va.

1739

Slave revolt, Stono, S.C., Sept. 9. Twenty-five Whites killed before insurrection was put down.

1741

Series of suspicious fires and reports of slave conspiracy led to general hysteria in New York City, March and April. Thirtyone slaves, five Whites executed.

1773

Massachusetts slaves petitioned legislature for freedom, Jan. 6. There is a record of 8 petitions during Revolutionary War period.

1791

Haitian Revolution began with revolt of slaves in northern province, Aug. 22.

1800

Gabriel Prosser plotted and was betrayed. Storm forced suspension of attack on Richmond, Va., by Prosser and some 1,000 slaves, Aug. 30. Conspiracy was betrayed by two slaves. Prosser and fifteen of his followers were hanged on Oct. 7.

1811

Louisiana slaves revolted in two parishes about 35 miles from New Orleans, Jan. 8-10. Revolt suppressed by U.S. troops. The largest slave revolt in the United States.

1816

Three hundred fugitive slaves and about 20 Indian allies held Fort Blount on Apalachicola Bay, Fla. …

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