Libraries Select SIRSI's Unicorn Library Management System

Information Today, February 2000 | Go to article overview

Libraries Select SIRSI's Unicorn Library Management System


SIRSI Corp. has announced that the District of Columbia Public Library (DCPL), Indiana University, and the U.S. Air Force have selected its Unicorn Library Management System to automate their libraries.

The DC Public Library

The DCPL, which has served users throughout the District of Columbia for more than 100 years, will use SIRSI's Unicorn System to automate the Martin Luther King Memorial Library and 26 branch libraries. Mary E. (Molly) Raphael, DCPI;s director, said, I have made customer service a major focus throughout the DCPL system. The SIRSI system is an important component in our goal for excellent service, not only for our external customers, but also for internal customers."

Established in 1896 in a house on New York Avenue, the District of Columbia Public Library has expanded to include the 400,000-square-foot G Street main facility, four regional branch libraries, 17 local branch libraries, four community libraries, and a kiosk. As the number of buildings has grown, so have the services offered by the library. The combined DCPL collection includes approximately 3 million items, including books, periodicals, books on tape, videotapes, compact discs, filmstrips, talking books, Braille books and periodicals, and musical scores. In addition to regular exhibits and educational programs, the DCPL offers special services for blind, deaf, physically handicapped, homebound, and institutionalized users; mobile service for senior citizens; licensed family day-care providers for children; telephone information services; and a systemwide Community Information Service.

Raphael said: "The Unicorn System will play an integral part in the DCPL's ability to meet the anticipated goals of our strategic plan. As we move into the 21 st century, I am very excited about rolling out this state-of-the-art integrated online system. It not only will allow us to continue to provide services to meet the needs of the traditional library user, it makes available services to attract the non-user and introduces improved services for the sophisticated user."

Indiana University Libraries

Indiana University will use the Unicorn System to automate the collections of the libraries on its main and outlying campuses.

Suzanne Thorin, Ruth Lilly University dean of university libraries, said: "Following a thorough and careful evaluation of library information systems currently on the market, Indiana University found the Unicorn system to clearly be state of the art for providing the Web-based library services that are critical to the university. The Unicorn System will enable the university to provide electronic access to library resources through a World Wide Web-based online catalog. …

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Libraries Select SIRSI's Unicorn Library Management System
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