Biblical and Rabbinic Literature

Shofar, January 31, 2001 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Biblical and Rabbinic Literature


Biblical and Rabbinic Literature

Das Auge Gottes: Textstrategie im Hiobbuch, by Melanie Köhlmoos. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1999. 400pp. ISBN 3-16-147140-7.

Which methods are employed to encourage the reader to interpret the Book of Job, and what part do dramaturgy and content play in this? Melanie Köhlmoos outlines the basic "textual strategy" of the Book of Job from the point of view of God's presence. Her interpretation is based on the interaction between the text, its readers, and other texts. The persons who appear, the questions on content, and the formal structures are all elements in the text which enable it to make a pact with its readers and to suggest to the reader a certain way of reading and interpreting it. (German)

Christliche Adversus-dudaeos-Bilder: Das Alte und Neue Testament im Spiegel der christlichen Kunst. Peter Lang: Frankfurt am Main, 1999. 469 pp., 411 illustrations. ISBN 3-631-33989-5.

This volume of anti-Jewish images culled from Christian Bibles complements the three volumes of Christian Adversus-Judaeos texts previously published. In addition to the images themselves, the book examines the theological motivations of Christian representations of Jews, their intended audience and their effect, and the social-historical and polemical context of the images. (German) (D.B.)

The Great Poems of the Bible: A Reader's Companion with New Translations, by James L. Kugel. New York: Free Press, 1999. 352 pp. ISBN 0-684-85774-X.

James Kugel offers a personal collection of poems in the Bible, including psalms like "The Lord is My Shepherd" and "By the Rivers of Babylon," Ecclesiastes' famous depiction of old age, Isaiah's "Arise, shine, for thy light has come!," Job's "Hymn to Wisdom," Deborah's victory song, David's lament on the death of Saul and Jonathan, and others, each with an accompanying essay.

Die großen rabbinischen Sammelwerke Palästinas: Zur literarischen Genese von Talmud Yerushalmi und Midrash Bereshit Rabba, by Hans-Jürgen Becker. Tübingen: Mohr-Siebeck, 1999. 218 pp. ISBN 3-16-146867-8.

An analytical overview that examines the origin, redaction, and relationship between the major collected Palestinian rabbinic works, Talmud Yerushalmi and Midrash Bereshit Rabba. Becker argues that the concept of an "Urtext" and of the final redaction in these volumes is not applicable. Instead, the literary genesis of these works was a much longer and dynamic process of transformation, integration or selection from a number of previously edited sources. (German) (D.B.)

"Heiligkeitsgesetz" und "Priesterschrift": Literaturgeschichtliche und rechtssystematische Untersuchungen zu Leviticus 17:1-26:2, by Andrews Ruwe. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1999. 400 pp. ISBN 3-16-147130-X.

In his study, the author presents a complete analysis of the so-called "Holiness Code" (Lev. 17-26). Andreas Ruwe shows that the sequence of rules and legal regulations combined in this text possesses a systematic consistency. In addition, he demonstrates that the Holiness Code is an integral part of the Priestly Code and the priestly role in the forming of the Pentateuch, since two of the commands contained in it, observing the Sabbath and revering the sanctuary, not only form the conceptional basis for the structure of Lev.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Biblical and Rabbinic Literature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.