Succession in Saudi Arabia

By Aboul-Enein, Youssef H. | Military Review, September/October 2003 | Go to article overview

Succession in Saudi Arabia


Aboul-Enein, Youssef H., Military Review


SUCCESSION IN SAUDIARABIA, Joseph A. Kechichian, Palgravc Press, New York, 2001, 287 pages, $59.95.

Joseph A. Kechichian, who has been an adviser for think-tanks and government agencies, is a prolific writer on the Middle East. His book, Succession in Saudi Arabia, is the first look at the dynamics of succession within the Al-Saud family since Alexander Bligh's book From Prince to King (New York University Press) was published in 1984. Kechichian's book is the first to address the succession issue beyond Regent Crown Prince Abdullah and the sons of King Abdul-Aziz, the founder of Saudi Arabia. Kechichian postulates several viable candidates from among the king's grandsons. The survival of the Saudi royal family, and who becomes king, directly bears on whether the United States can maintain peaceful relations with the desert kingdom.

The story of the Al-Saud family begins in 1901 and continues for three decades. King Abdul-Aziz used a complex system of alliances with several tribes, families, and his own extended family to secure loyalty. One of his more important allies was the Al-al-Shaykh family, who were descendants of Islamic revivalist Abdul-Wahab, who preached during the 18th century. The Al-al-Shaykh family dominated religious and justice ministries, and Al-Saud's marriage gave the royal family its religious legitimacy.

The Al-Rashids, who were rivals to Al-Saud and who had forced them into exile from Central Arabia in the 19th century were also co-opted by war and marriage. The Sudayris is another old and aristocratic family in Arabia. Abdul-Aziz's mother was a Sudayri, and he also married into this family. His seven sons from the marriage now occupy major ministerial posts and governorships.

Knowing Abdul-Aziz's maternal lineage helps us understand the different branches of his line. Abdul-Aziz had an older brother who challenged Abdul-Aziz's authority to rule. Based on seniority, the descendants of this brother, known as the Saud-al-Kabir line, represent another aspect of the family, which requires recognition and analysis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Succession in Saudi Arabia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.