Profits to Flow for Period-Stopping Drug

By Joyce, Zanna | Herizons, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

Profits to Flow for Period-Stopping Drug


Joyce, Zanna, Herizons


[Graph Not Transcribed]

The first continuous-use oral contraceptive to be marketed specifically as a method to drastically reduce women's menstrual cycles is expected to be on the North American market as early as this Summer.

Currently under review by the US Food and Drug Administration. Seasonale, developed by Barr Laboratories, would reduce a woman's ovulation and menstruation cycles from an average of 12 a year to four. The estrogen and progestin content is comparable to standard oral contraceptives, but the hormones have a lower cumulative dosage. Normally, oral contraceptives reduce the growth of the lining in the uterus; Seasonale is designed to suppress it altogether.

Controlling menstruation in week four of a 28-day oral contraceptive regime by skipping the placebos is not news; many women on the pill have postponed their period using this method for special events on an occasional basis. Pharmaceutical manufacturers are expected to promote their product as an ongoing means to give women greater control over their bodies. Although the drug has not yet been approved in Canada, women's health activists here are already sounding the alarm bell.

"There are a lot of questions that are not being asked about the impact of taking oral contraceptives on women's health," says Christine Hitchcock, a researcher at the Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research (CeMCOR) in Vancouver. "One area that concerns us is the potential effect of extended oral contraceptives on normal ovarian cycles." Hitchcock is worried about the potential health effects on young women who use extended oral contraceptives before their ovarian cycles are well established. Currently, about 18 percent of Canadian women use oral contraceptives. A small percentage take continuous contraceptive regimes because their periods are very painful or because they are at a high risk of ovarian cancer.

Research presents mixed evaluations of the health risks associated with oral contraceptive use. While ovarian and endometrial cancers appear to be reduced, there is an increase in breast and cervical cancers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Profits to Flow for Period-Stopping Drug
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.