Kathryn Kish Sklar, Anjar Schuler, Susan Strasser (Eds.): Social Justice Feminists in the United States and Germany; A Dialogue in Documents, 1885-1933

By S, Linda | Transformations, September 3, 1999 | Go to article overview

Kathryn Kish Sklar, Anjar Schuler, Susan Strasser (Eds.): Social Justice Feminists in the United States and Germany; A Dialogue in Documents, 1885-1933


S, Linda, Transformations


Kathryn Kish Sklar, Anjar Schuler, Susan Strasser (eds.): Social Justice Feminists in the United States and Germany; A Dialogue in Documents, 1885-1933.

Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1998. Paperback. 381 pages. $19.95.

Linda S. Watts is professor of American Studies and Director of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington, Bothell.

We fatuously hoped that we might pluck from the human tragedy itself a consciousness of a common destiny which should bring its own hearing, that we might extract from life's very misfortunes a power of cooperation which should be effective against them.

Jane Addams, Twenty Years at Hull House

Social Justice Feminists speaks with the voices of many women, from both Germany and the United States, linked through their commitment to action informed by public conscience. The book sets forward a spectrum of feminist reformers and radicals emerging, as historian Christopher Lasch has argued in The New Radicalism in America, 1889-1933, largely from the educated middle class: suffragists, birth controllers, social workers, labor organizers, pacifists, and socialists. These disparate political cultures converge around a common cause -- what Jane Addams (1860-1935) characterized as the "desire to interpret democracy in social terms." (98)

Addams, a social worker prominent in the social welfare reform movement, proves to be the central figure in the collection. Perhaps best remembered as the founder of Chicago's Hull House, an internationally influential settlement house of the Progressive era, Addams had a remarkable career working for social change. As an author, she sought ways to align social theory with action in the lived world. As a leader, she built an illustrious record: founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, chair of the Women's Peace Party, president of the International Congress of Women and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and co-recipient of the 1932 Nobel Peace Prize. Feminists from Florence Kelley to Alice Salomon turned to Addams for counsel and direction, as their letters to her and translations of her work (or its principles), both referenced within this collection, attest.

The book's editors reconstruct -- and help readers explore -- the transatlantic dialogue among these activist women. A substantive introductory essay creates a context for the collected documents, consisting largely of the women's letters, speeches, and articles. Together, the texts bear witness to a nascent international women's movement sustained through correspondence, world organizations and world-wide meetings, such as the Women's Peace Congress and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. In this well-framed and carefully researched volume, the reader gains an understanding of American-German partnerships among women pledged to creating a more just society, not only for women, but also for the poor, immigrants, and children.

Although Addams and her contemporaries are hardly neglected figures, this book places U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kathryn Kish Sklar, Anjar Schuler, Susan Strasser (Eds.): Social Justice Feminists in the United States and Germany; A Dialogue in Documents, 1885-1933
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.