A New Threat to the ABM Treaty: The Administration's TMD PR

Arms Control Today, January 1994 | Go to article overview

A New Threat to the ABM Treaty: The Administration's TMD PR


Eight days after the Clinton administration presented a new proposal to permit development, testing and deployment of advanced anti-tactical ballistic missile (ATBM) systems to the Standing Consultative Commission of the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty in Geneva, the Arms Control Association (ACA) held a news conference to discuss the dangers the new proposal posed to the central point of the treaty--to prevent development, or the basis for development, of a nationwide anti-ballistic missile system. While focusing on the specific issues that threaten the safeguards built into the ABM Treaty, the panel also looked at the role Congress has played in the past, and many again play in response to the administration's proposal. Panelists for the December 8, 1993 news conference included Spurgeon M. Keeny, Jr., ACA president and executive director; Jack Mendelsohn, ACA deputy director; John Rhinelander, vice chairman of the ACA board of directors; John Pike, director of the Space Policy Project of the Federation of American Scientists; and Kenneth Luongo, senior Washington representative for Arms Control and International Security at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

SPURGEON M. KEENY, JR.: Welcome to this morning's press conference sponsored by the Arms Control Association on the administration's proposal on theater missile defenses (TMA) that could constitute a new threat to the ABM Treaty.

We have called this press conference on very short notice because of a shared concern that the proposal the administration presented in Geneva last week to the Standing Consultative Commission of the ABM Treaty is so permissive that it would undercut the central objective of the ABM Treaty--to prevent deployment, or the basis for deployment, of a nationwide ballistic missile defense. The criteria would permit Russia or the United States to deploy missile interceptors in any number with any level of capability or sophistication provided they are not actually tested against targets with reentry velocities of more than 5 kilometers per second, which translates roughly to a missile with a 3,000-kilometer range.

Some of us here recall the great debate in the early 1970s about the potential capabilities toward a national defense of the Soviet Union provided by the Soviet SA-5, a primitive air defense missile by today's standards. And in the 1980s, the United States was very concerned that Soviet testing of the SA-12 surface-to-air missile (SAM) against the 900-kilometer range SS-12 ballistic missile, which had a re-entry velocity in the 2-kilometer-per-second range, would provide the base for a Soviet nationwide defense system. In discussing this problem yesterday, the secretary of defense admonished us all not to look at it from a strictly Cold War perspective and I think this is good advice.

I do not think this proposal threatens to reignite a major U.S.-Russian offensive ballistic missile race as would have been the case if there had been a threatened nationwide defense at the height of the Cold War. But even though this proposal probably would not interfere with START I or even START II, it could very easily have a delaying or chilling effect on efforts to move toward significantly lower levels of strategic offensive missile deployments if we are faced with the possibility of nationwide defenses not only in Russia, but in many other countries as well. This is because this proposal would permit either Russia or the United States not only to deploy, but to sell or provide, these systems to other countries.

Moreover, the threat requiring this proposal is not clear. In his comments, Defense Secretary Les Aspin made a major point that there were some 20 countries actively engaged in the development of nuclear weapons or other weapons of mass destruction. This threat has not been documented, and I think the statement is quite misleading.

He also suggested that there are a dozen countries with ballistic missiles at the present time.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A New Threat to the ABM Treaty: The Administration's TMD PR
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.