Roads More or Less Traveled

By Chipley, Abigail | Vegetarian Times, May 2000 | Go to article overview

Roads More or Less Traveled


Chipley, Abigail, Vegetarian Times


Vegetarian Walt Disney World and Greater Orlindo, by Susan Shumaker and Than Saffel (Stone Circle Productions, 2000

What better sign that vegetarianism has gone mainstream than a book on cruelty-free eating in the world's top tourist destination? Prospects for the veggie visitor initially look bleak, admit the authors, who describe Orlando as "a seemingly endless parade of frighteningly similar steakhouses, burger joints and concept restaurants, intended to simultaneously dazzle and comfort Mt and Mrs. Carnivorous Mall dweller." But there are indeed healthy--even spectacular-alternatives, and this husband-andwife team scour the land of Mickey, interviewing chefs and restaurateurs. Eating their way through the theme park, they critique more than 200 restaurants based on their "vegebility," as well as price and overall qualiry. This informationpacked hook also rates vegetarian-friendly lodgings and even gives tips on how to get a decent meatless airline meal as you wing your way there.

River-Horse, by William Least Heat-Moon (Houghton Mifflin, 1999) Veteran travel writer William Least Heat-Moon offers up a unique perspective on the contemporary American landscape, In his latest odyssey; the author of Blue Highways takes to the road again, only this time it's the highways of yore-the nation's rivers. Setting sail from New York Harbor on a 22-foot cruiser named Nikawa (the Osage tribe's word for "river horse"), Heat-Moon follows in the footsteps of Lewis and Clark, rediscovering the forgotten culture of America's great rivers, including the Hudson, Ohio and Mississippi. Four months later, he's a seasoned sailor, having battled raging winds, floods and rapids.

But this book isn't merely an adventure tale. Heat-Moon describes the grittier side of America's waterways, delving into the politics of agricultural pollution, Flood-control projects and the dams that have driven out the salmon revered by Native Americans. …

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