Social Security in Review

Social Security Bulletin, January 1, 1999 | Go to article overview

Social Security in Review


New SSA Executive

On November 22, 1999, William A. Halter was sworn in as the Deputy Commissioner of Social Security. As the independent agency's first Deputy Commissioner, he serves as Chief

Operating Officer and as Secretary to the Social Security Board of Trustees. Mr. Halter indicates that he will focus on building on existing infrastructures to develop support in the appropriations process and in developing partnerships for new legislation. "Dealing with stakeholders and with Congress has taken on added dimensions now that SSA has independent agency status," stated Mr. Halter, "and we are planning to do more to advance our relationships with both."

Mr. Halter previously served as a Senior Advisor in the Office of Management and Budget where he coordinated activities of the President's Management Council, as the Chief Economist for the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance, and as an economist for the Joint Economic Committee of Congress. Mr. Halter holds economic degrees from Stanford University and from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

New Associate Commissioner of ORP

Former Congresswoman Barbara Kennelly, Counselor at the Social Security Administration who works closely with the Commissioner and Members of Congress, also currently holds the position of Associate Commissioner of the Office of Retirement Policy. The Office of Retirement Policy is responsible for providing analysis and development in the areas of social insurance, financing, and economic policy.

A life-long resident of Hartford, Connecticut, Ms. Kennelly received a Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from Trinity College, Washington, D.C. She earned a certificate from the Harvard Business School on completion of the HarvardRadcliffe Program in Business Administration, and a Master's degree in Government from Trinity College, Hartford. Prior to joining SSA, former Congresswoman Kennelly served 9 terms in Congress and was the Secretary of the State of Connecticut. She replaces James Roosevelt who left the agency in November 1999.

SSA's Electronic Newsletter

Get the latest Social Security news at the click of the mouse. Beginning March 1, 2000, the Social Security Administration (SSA) will send Social Security news as it happens to individuals and organizations across America who request it. SSA's new service, Social Security e-news, is an electronic newsletter available free to subscribers through the Agency's Internet site, Social Security Online. Beginning February 15, subscribers can sign-up for Social Security e-news by providing their e-mail address.

"Social Security e-news will provide the latest Social Security information to subscribers the minute it is made public," said William Halter, Deputy Commissioner of Social Security. "We hope that beneficiaries, workers, employers and professionals who handle Social Security issues will all find Social Security e-news very useful and timely."

Subscribers to Social Security e-news will have several options available to them. Just by subscribing, they will receive a monthly newsletter containing general Social Security news. The stories will relate to current program developments and related events and be geared to the information needs of both current workers and beneficiaries.

In addition to the monthly general newsletter, subscribers can also elect to receive timely news updates on specific topics. Subscribers will be able to select specialized news in the areas of

* Disability

* Law and Regulations

* Retirement

* Press Office

* Survivors

* Survivors

* Wage Reporting

* Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Issues

* Data, Studies, and Research

* Medicare

Each brief story contained in Social Security e-news will be hyperlinked to the location on SSA's Web side where more information on the subject is available. Social Security e-news will provide subscribers with quick access to the vast volume of information generated on Social Security Online without the need to surf the `net. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Social Security in Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.