Forging Sound Strategic Alliances

By Giordan, Judith C. | Research-Technology Management, March/April 1995 | Go to article overview

Forging Sound Strategic Alliances


Giordan, Judith C., Research-Technology Management


Joint technology projects or alliances between and among companies require clear and logical planning up front, appropriate monitoring during the project's lifetime, and clear criteria for ending the relationship. Do this, paying attention to some critical details listed below, and you can realize tremendous leverage.

Up Front

1. Define the value you each expect from the project/alliance.

* Articulate the expectations you have of each other and the project.

* Discuss and clarify the needs you each have before, during and after product commercialization.

* Define the strategic impact/fit of the alliance for each side.

* Articulate the advantage to both of you from the relationship.

2. Define the benefits/rewards you each expect from the project.

* Clearly articulate both the tangible and intangible benefits: solely profits or exclusive suppliership, lead time on the market, patent rights, publications and presentations.

* Discuss the timing required by each side before gaining the reward/benefits.

* Come to closure on the risk associated with the reward, and if you both agree to it.

3. Discuss each of your cultures and general practices--culture always wins out; compatibility and flexibility are critical.

Discuss each of your processes/criteria for project selection to assure strategic fit.

* Agree on project planning and monitoring processes to indicate level of detail and presentation style.

* Discuss your levels of risk tolerance or aversion, and gain agreement.

* Communicate your corporate values to assure they are compatible.

Set-up

Once you have laid the groundwork for the interaction and believe there are reasons for mutual benefit, the alliance must be able to codify, in some manner, the agreements reached in points 1-3, above.

4. Develop and finalize formal agreements.

* Through joint development and confidentiality agreements, define rights to technology, timing for commercialization, patent or trade secret rights, cost recovery, and technology exclusivity.

* Define clearly the processes for amicably following up and assuring compliance with written agreements.

5. Define roles and resources--there is no silent partner in a true cross-functional team.

* Define the role and responsibilities of the project team, who they report to and how.

* Spell out the resources each side will supply--equipment/facilities and people.

* Articulate the priority of this project to each partner, and the time available.

Planning and Monitoring

With the legal documentation and resource allocation clearly defined, the team must now get the job done. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Forging Sound Strategic Alliances
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.