It Takes a Village.To Work for Women's Rights

By Bennett-Haigney, Lisa | National NOW Times, Spring 2000 | Go to article overview

It Takes a Village.To Work for Women's Rights


Bennett-Haigney, Lisa, National NOW Times


Action Center

Staff Profiles

The purpose of this regular feature is for NOW members to get to know the staff at the National NOW Action Center. These are the people who write the stories in this paper, keep membership records updated, help raise money for the organization, make sure NOW's name is in the press, and all the other functions that bring our members' grassroots work together. Come meet staff members at the National Conference in Miami Beach June 30-July 2 registration form on page 12). Previous staff profiles can lie found at www.now.org/actionct.html and more will follow in upcoming issues.

Lisa Bennett-Haigney,

Publications Manner

As NOW's Publications Manager, Lisa edits the National NOW Times and produces brochures, issue reports and conference program books. She is responsible for maintaining all of NOW's national resolutions in the Policy Manual. Lisa is also coordinating the Watch Out Listen Up media activism campaign currently in progress. After toiling in television research for years, Lisa came to NOW to find more fulfilling and purposeful work. When she's not at work, she writes fiction, cooks, watches too much TV and visits friends in New York City. Lisa plans someday to have her novels published and to run her own magazine.

Rebecca Farmer,

Communications Associate

Rebecca works with both media relations and publications at the Action Center. She responds to media inquiries, schedules interviews for the national of ficers and generates media interest and visibility for NOW. She was also a NOW organizer on last year's Lilith Fair Tour and assists with editing and production of the National NOW Times, brochures and conference program books. Rebecca is originally from Sacramento and went to school in Oregon. She moved across the country to join the NOW staff in spring 1999 after interning at the Action Center the previous summer. Rebecca has future plans to be a published writer and feminist state legislator.

Cindy Hanford, Equality

Action Fund Manager

Cindy runs NOW's sustainer program to which dedicated donors give monthly pledges, thus providing a predictable income that allows NOW to take action on urgent issues. Cindy also works in the chapter and state development department, bringing her experience as a NOW activist since 1978 in North and South Carolina and on NOW's national committee on Ending Violence Against Women. A former college instructor, Cindy left a Ph.D. program after being told she could not write a dissertation on women's history because it was "insignificant." In her spare time, Cindy is an activist against size discrimination and collects music from the '50s and '60s.

Chris Myers. …

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It Takes a Village.To Work for Women's Rights
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