Advertising and Public Relations Education: A Five-Year Review

By Johnson, Keith F.; Ross, Billy I. | Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, Spring 2000 | Go to article overview

Advertising and Public Relations Education: A Five-Year Review


Johnson, Keith F., Ross, Billy I., Journalism & Mass Communication Educator


The growth in the fields of advertising and public relations education at American universities has been dramatic. Last year, 12,068 degrees were awarded in advertising, public relations, or combined advertising/public relations programs while nearly 40,000 students were enrolled in these degree programs.

For over 30 years, the reporting of the status of advertising education has been an ongoing enterprise, reported in various forms. The two most noted ones are:

The annual Becker/Kosicki reports in Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, which measures the status of accredited and other mass communication programs, and

Where shall 1 go to study advertising and public relations? (Ross 1965; Ross & Hileman 1966-1983; Ross 19841990; Ross & Johnson 1991-1992; Ross & Johnson 1993-1999), which measures advertising, public relations, and combined advertising/public relations programs both within accredited and other schools of mass communication and extneds beyond that to include such degee programs as those in schools of business, speech, etc.

Maintinaing accurate historical records of the status of advertising, publc relations and combined advertising/ public relations education programs serves amny purposes. Each year the results are used by students, career and guidance counselors, and college professors to identify where programsn exist, the largest programs and largest faculties in terms of degrees granted, enrollment, faculty, etc. In aggregate they constitute the status of the advertising education enterprise at individual points in time.

Ross has published two volumes, Advertising aeducation (1965), which was the basis for the directory beginning, and The Status of Advertising Education (1991), an update of the 1965 report. The volumes report on the history and trends of advertising education, institutions offering advertising programs, curricula of undergraduate and graduate programs, and aggregate totals of graduates, students and faculty are investigated in total and by established regions.

The purpose of this research is to investigate data reported in Where shall I go to study advertising? over the last five years and measure growth and decline of degrees granted, level of those degrees (B.A., M.A., Ph.D.), and changes in enrollment and faculty.

Historical perspective The use of historical data for analysis is grounded in academic literature. Historical analysis gives understanding of the environment of an institution at points of time. Driven by the axiom that those who do not follow history are doomed to repeat it, historical analysis also provides insight and, frequently, predictive capability to researchers.

Obviously, the methodology has its benefits and limitations. Data from Where shall I go to study advertising and public relations? is essentially an archive. Wimmer and Dominick (1997) point out that a data archive provides research data for measures not otherwise available or used for a specific purpose at the time of the research. Industry data can report on current situations for an immediately applied use, while in an archive form it provides retrospective data with which one can plot the growth and decline - and frequently predict the future status - of an industry or product category. Becker (1981) defines secondary analysis as the reuse of social science data after they have been put aside by the researcher who gather them.

Benefits of the historical perspective suggest the data may help answer questions not originally posed by the researchers. Limitations of this approach include a lack of knowledge about the types of research questions which were investigated, how the data were collected, and the rigor of the sampling procedures or research design used.

Literature review There are many archives from which such data can be found. Universities annually report to their state governing boards, and national figures are also available from federal resources. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Advertising and Public Relations Education: A Five-Year Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.