Career Development and Public Policy

By Watts, A. G. | Career Development Quarterly, June 2000 | Go to article overview

Career Development and Public Policy


Watts, A. G., Career Development Quarterly


The rationale for policy interest in career development services and the way in which this rationale is being strengthened by the current transformations in work and career are discussed. The potential roles of public policy in relation to career development services are explored, along with ways in which such services can influence the policy-making process. A range of policy issues related to making career development services available to all throughout life are identified. Stronger structures and processes are needed to bring together career development practitioners with policy makers and other stakeholder interests in order to address tasks of common concern.

Hitherto, remarkably little attention has been paid to policy issues in the career development field. With rare exceptions (e.g., Pryor & Watts, 1991; Watts, 1996), there has been no tradition of policy studies in the professional literature. Little consideration is given to policy matters in the training of counselors and other career development professionals. Yet the availability of career development services and their nature are strongly dependent on public policy. Most such services are funded, directly or indirectly, by governments, whether at the national, the regional, or the local level. The nature of such funding imposes constraints on the kinds of services that are offered and to whom they are made available. If the career development profession is to extend and develop its services, its relationship with policy makers is crucial. Conversely, policy makers who see career development services as a significant policy instrument need the support and understanding of practitioners to achieve their goals. If policy decisions are made without adequate consultation, they are unlikely to be implemented effectively.

Accordingly, stronger links are needed between policy makers and practitioners. Policy makers-who include both politicians and their civil-service advisers-need to develop a deeper understanding of the nature of career development work. Practitioners need to develop a deeper understanding of the ways in which policy is developed and implemented. Both sides need to take responsibility for initiating and sustaining this dialogue.

In this article, I explore the relationship between public policy and career development services, drawing on the discussions at an international symposium on "Career Development and Public Policy: International Collaboration for National Action," held in Ottawa in 1999. The symposium was organized by the Canadian Career Development Foundation in association with the International Association for Educational and Vocational Guidance. The 47 participants came from 14 countries. The design was that there would be four representatives from each country, including two policy advisers (i.e., senior civil servants) and two professional leaders, although some teams deviated from this norm. Each team produced a country paper that was distributed in advance and then discussed in plenary at the symposium. In addition, there were theme papers from international experts plus small-group sessions that addressed particular issues relating to each theme. The present article is adapted from a report to be included in the symposium proceedings (Hiebert & Walz, in press). It draws substantially from discussions at the event and from the papers prepared for it (all of which will be included in revised form in the proceedings) but also represents a personal commentary on the matters discussed.

RATIONALE

The key rationale for policy interest in career development services is that they represent a public as well as a private good. They are usually of value to the individuals to whom they are addressed. But they also yield benefits to the wider society. Conventionally, these benefits have been divided into two main categories. The first is economic efficiency in the allocation and use of human resources.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Career Development and Public Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.