Pulp Culture: The Art of Fiction Magazines

By Jan, Alfred | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), Summer 1999 | Go to article overview

Pulp Culture: The Art of Fiction Magazines


Jan, Alfred, Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


Pulp Culture: The Art of Fiction Magazines. Frank M. Robinson and Lawrence Davidson. Portland: Collectors Press, 1998.

This impressive history of pulp fiction will be the standard with which future efforts will be compared. Robinson and Davidson easily surpassed the two existing comprehensive surveys, namely The Pulps, edited by Tony Goodstone in 1970, and Danger Is My Business, by Lee Server from 1993, in terms of historical depth and the 440 color cover illustrations, the most in any book published to date. After an introduction and general history, the authors devote one chapter to each separate genre, including adventure, detective, western, super-hero and villain, weird menace, love and sex, sports, war and aviation, science fiction and fantasy, and miscellaneous and odd categories. They also include a chapter highlighting early careers of famous authors like Tennessee Williams, Ray Bradbury, and L. Ron Hubbard, who got their starts in the pulps. Last, material on relative values, bibliography, and pulp dealers round out the book.

As cultural artifacts, pulps reflected societal attitudes of their time. To the authors' credit, they acknowledge and critique racist and sexist cover depictions, especially in the adventure, hero/villain detective, and weird menace genres. African-- Americans were portrayed as savages, and Asian villains with slanted eyes and droopy Fu-Manchu mustaches were always threatening or torturing the blond hero or his female companion. Yet the situations were not always so cut and dried. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pulp Culture: The Art of Fiction Magazines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.