20th Century Presidents: WHO HAVE INFLUENCED THE HIGHER EDUCATION LANDSCAPE

Black Issues in Higher Education, December 23, 1999 | Go to article overview

20th Century Presidents: WHO HAVE INFLUENCED THE HIGHER EDUCATION LANDSCAPE


20th Century Presidents: WHO HAVE INFLUENCED THE HIGHER EDUCATION LANDSCAPE

Derek Bok, Harvard University

William Bowen, Princeton University, Mellon Foundation

They know rivers and write eloquently about the ebb and flow of affirmative action in higher education.

Horace Mann Bond

Fort Valley State College, Lincoln University-Pennsylvania

This father of civil rights activist Julian Bond emerged as an early critic of the dubious intelligence theories and myths springing up from the IQ testing movement.

Lionel Bordeaux

Sinte Gleska University

He led his institution to become one of the first two tribally controlled colleges to receive accreditation for a bachelor's degree program and the first to earn accreditation for a master's program.

Ray Bowen

La Guardia Community College

Distinguished for his candor in describing the plight of minorities in higher education and articulating what higher education must do in the face of its demographic imperative.

Oswald Bronson

Bethune-Cookman College

He does Mary McLeod Bethune's legacy proud.

Clinton Bristow Jr.

Alcorn State University

He shows what can be done even in the belly of the beast.

Ruth Burgos-Scasscer

Houston Community College

She brings a distinguished career in international women's issues to bear on this fast-growing urban community college.

Roscoe C. Brown Jr.

Bronx Community College

He is a former Tuskegee Airman who successfully flew through New York's educational politics.

John Casteen

University of Virginia

Though recently challenged, his policies resulted in anenviable recruitment record and a 90 percent Black graduation rate.

Rufus Clement

Atlanta University

This former university president went on to became the first African American to be elected to a citywide office in Atlanta since the Reconstruction era.

Jewell Plummet-Cobb

California State University-Fullerton

This pioneering researcher brought a perspective about the benefits of diversity in the pursuit of academic excellence to the California State system that continues to this day.

Johnnetta B. Cole

Spelman College

This "sister president" showed that you don't have to be a "seven sister" to be top rate.

Thomas Cole

Clark Atlanta University

His steadfast leadership of this anchor institution in the Atlanta University Center has been a model for others to replicate.

Samuel DuBois Cook

Dillard University

Thanks to his many years of leadership, Dillard is now positioned to compete with the leading institutions in Louisiana.

John Crecine

Georgia Institute of Technology

Because of him, Georgia Tech is envied in terms of minority engineer production.

Jim Duderstadt

University of Michigan

He believed that unless one could show that the numbers of underrepresented minorities on campus had increased, claiming to have a commitment to diversity was meaningless.

Vera King Farris

Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

Because of her, students in South New Jersey have a first-rate educational option.

Edward B. Fort

North Carolina A & T University

He understood how to make his institution thrive in an Adams environment.

Juliet Garcia

Texas Southmost College

Thanks to her, the fastest growing minority group in America, Latinos, has a brighter educational prospect.

J. Wade Gilley

University of Tennessee

In Virginia, West Virginia, and now in Tennessee, he has constantly opened the doors of opportunity to Black students, faculty and staff.

Frank Hale

Oakwood College

Through his work with Anne Pruitt, he showed how much you can accomplish even after retirement.

William "Bill" Harvey

Hampton University

Through to his bold entrepreneurial style, he has made Hampton is the envy of private colleges in America while holding true to the legacy of former President Jerome Brud Holland. …

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20th Century Presidents: WHO HAVE INFLUENCED THE HIGHER EDUCATION LANDSCAPE
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