Noteworthy News: University of Texas Is Finished Fighting Affirmative Action, Officials Say

Black Issues in Higher Education, December 2, 2001 | Go to article overview

Noteworthy News: University of Texas Is Finished Fighting Affirmative Action, Officials Say


noteworthy news: University of Texas Is Finished Fighting Affirmative Action, Officials Say

After years of appeals, the University of Texas said last month that it was finished fighting its landmark court battle over affirmative action.

The decision effectively ends the case named for Cheryl Hopwood and three other Whites who sued the university's law school in 1992, saying they were denied admission because of a policy that gave preferential treatment to less-qualified Hispanic and Black applicants.

The lawsuit wound up before the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which in 1996 rejected the university's contention that it should be allowed to consider race in admissions.

The so-called Hopwood ruling didn't block the school from using race as a factor in admissions, but prompted public colleges and universities in Texas to drop affirmative action policies.

The ruling was allowed to stand in 1996 by the U.S. Supreme Court, which refused to hear another challenge by the university in June.

The school could have kept the case alive by appealing the 5th Circuit's decision ordering it to pay legal fees, but university President Larry Faulkner said that wouldn't happen.

"We vigorously pursued appeals, arguing the complex issues surrounding affirmative action, to resolve these important issues for the nation at large," Faulkner says. "The Hopwood case will clearly not be the one that leads to this resolution."

The Supreme Court hasn't ruled definitively on affirmative action since the 1978 Bakke decision, when the majority said universities may take race into account in admissions. However, challenges to the University of Michigan's preferential policies could reach the high court during the current term. In those cases, a federal judge in Detroit struck down the admissions policy of the University of Michigan law school, saying the criteria were not clearly defined and relied too heavily on race.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Noteworthy News: University of Texas Is Finished Fighting Affirmative Action, Officials Say
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.