Black Women Diving into the Soccer Spotlight

By M, Robin | Black Issues in Higher Education, August 5, 1999 | Go to article overview

Black Women Diving into the Soccer Spotlight


M, Robin, Black Issues in Higher Education


Black Women Diving into the Soccer Spotlight

WASHINGTON -- Her team-mates call her "The Wall" and it is easy to see why after Brianna Scurry's performance during last month's World Cup semifinal soccer game against Brazil. She made six spectacular saves against the Brazilians to lead her teammates to the championship contest against China. While Brandi Chastain made the game-winning goal to push the Americans past the Chinese team 5-4 in the shoot-out period, Scurry's headlong dive to stop Liu Ying's penalty kick played just as important a role in the victory.

"She's just so intense," says Shannon Brown, this year's Arthur Ashe Jr. Scholar of the Year and former star soccer player at the University of Wisconsin, of Scurry. "She's exciting to watch and flashy. The saves she makes are amazing and it's that kind of excitement and flash that will attract not only more Black girls, but people in general to the game."

Brown, currently a promotions assistant for The New York Times and 1998 All-American defender for the Badgers, grew up playing soccer alongside her older brothers and believes early exposure is the key to getting more young Black women interested in the sport.

"There are so few Black women in soccer it's disappointing," says Brown, who notes that in her entire soccer career she's never met one Black female coach. "There are plenty of Black girls who are athletic enough to play soccer, but just don't get the early exposure."

Scurry, an all-star soccer graduate of the University of Massachusetts is one of two African American women on the U.S. women's team, along with Saskia Webber, reserve goalie from Rutgers University. While in college, Brianna won two national goalkeeper of the year awards and led the Minutemen to the semifinals of the NCAA Final Four. She was also voted top female athlete in her home state of Minnesota in her senior year of high school.

"There is no visible weakness in her game," says Jim Rudy, Scurry's former coach at the University of Massachusetts. "What typifies Brianna's style of play and sets her apart from other goalkeepers is her calmness, coolness, and composure. She's great on the ground, great in the air, and great on breakaways. She appears completely unflappable."

Rudy also remembers Brianna as a solid political science student, well-liked by professors and coaches. He hopes that more African American girls and women will be inspired by Scurry as a player and person.

"Bri is special by human being standards. She has integrity, honesty, reliability, and she treats people well," he says.

But according to Rudy, the major barriers to more African Americans and other minorities entering the sport are financial and cultural.

"It's an expensive proposition to get into Olympic development programs, so it is unreachable for many people," says Rudy who estimates that competitive regional league games that require travel can cost parents $1,500 to $2,000. "Now, the U.S. is on top of the world in women's soccer, but in five or 10 years, it may not be that way unless we get the African American and other ethnic populations on board. …

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