Before Canseco: Early History of Latinos in Baseball Full of Hits and Runs around the Colorline

By Rodriguez, Roberto | Black Issues in Higher Education, April 18, 1996 | Go to article overview

Before Canseco: Early History of Latinos in Baseball Full of Hits and Runs around the Colorline


Rodriguez, Roberto, Black Issues in Higher Education


Before Canseco: Early History of Latinos in Baseball Full of Hits and. Runs Around the Colorline

Prior to the officially mandated segregation of the sport in 1878, American baseball, in its humble and loosely structured beginnings, featured on its rosters scores of Latino players who are now stirring the attention of contemporary researchers and historians.

This research is focused on the obsession with America's pastime in Latin America and the generally unwritten history of the participation of Latinos in U.S. baseball.

Popular lore says that baseball came to Latin America during the many American occupations during the 19th century. But Lou Perez, history professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, says that in many instances baseball actually came to Latin America via the "elite" upper-economic class families pursuing studies in the United States.

Fully Embraced

Writing in the September issue of the Journal of American History, Perez says that baseball was introduced to Cuba in the 1860s by returning students. The sport was fully embraced by all Cubans, particularly because it became associated with modernity, progress and independence. In the struggle for independence, many Cuban baseball players "put their baseball bats down and picked up the machete," says Perez.

By the time the United States arrived in Cuba in 1898 (during the Spanish-American War), Cubans were already playing baseball. Such was their zeal that, according to Perez, professional Cuban teams regularly beat visiting U.S. teams.

Angel Torres, a sports journalist and author of two self-published baseball books, "The History of Cuban Baseball, 1878-1976," and "The Baseball Bible," says that with the advent of segregation, Latinos in the United States were on both sides of the colorline. While some Latinos played exclusively in the major, or white, leagues, others -- and they were more prevalent -- played in the Negro leagues. Even light or "white" Latinos played in the Negro Leagues, he says. The reason all Latinos were welcome in the Negro Leagues is because Black baseball players -- who were not allowed to play in the U.S. major leagues -- were welcomed throughout Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and other Latin American countries, where baseball was embraced and professional leagues flourished.

Not Black, Not White

Writing this year in Journal of Negro History Adrian Burgos, a graduate student at the University of Michigan, says that the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Before Canseco: Early History of Latinos in Baseball Full of Hits and Runs around the Colorline
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.