A Brand New Sydney Opera House (after Harrison)

By Mutunzhima, Liala | Hecate, January 1, 1994 | Go to article overview

A Brand New Sydney Opera House (after Harrison)


Mutunzhima, Liala, Hecate


We will build it together my earthly presence and those lost souls of the Carl incident of 1872, for which you were tried for mass murder. It will be in the same town, not only of that first great house, but also of the trial. Well, Clayton's trial that is, the trial you're having, when you're not having a trial. Why--the good folk of old Sydney town soon saw to that. They so quickly and conveniently forgot their own heritage of chains--rioting in the streets at the very suggestion of a European--white man--being brought to book over such a business--and black pagans.

Back to our monument.

Of course we will call upon the advice of 959,000 other heavenly spirits--that being the said difference between the population of these isles in 1801 and 1935. Clear one million, down to forty-one thousand. Not a bad score, without really trying. Oh, the odd entrapment and massacre of course, just to keep the hand in--but otherwise achieved by just shipment off in boatloads and chains, followed then by Europe's ubiquitous maladies: measles, influenza, mumps, scarlet fever, chickenpox, whooping cough--even the common cold and pneumonia--that in Paradise all became quite simply, stunning pandemics.

We will dedicate our opera house in the same spirit as the first--to dignity and freedom in all human expression--which of course co-incides with the tone of your actions aboard the good labour ship Carl in the lee of Epi Island that day. First you enticed ninety simple souls out of their villages and alongside with promises of Europe's largess--beads and mirrors and all sorts of things, in exchange for labour and land. Then you had your burly crew sink their canoes, so that the ninety bobbed about in that shark infested water like little fuzzy golliwogs, with great round and brown, wide-frightened eyes. From there, there didn't seem to be much more encouragement necessary to get them aboard. The hardy crew just had to pull them up a few at a time and hustle them below, locking them in a compartment specially built for the purpose, and from past experience. No portholes, and solid splittered planks for bunks, just above bilgewater line.

Ninety of them, and on the second night they showed their ingratitude for such treatment and accommodation by dismantling the bunks, to try to use as battering rams for a breakout. You and the crew handled things calmly though--just stood back outside the chamber and peppered the walls and doors with pistol fire, for two nights and days. When you finally opened up, five were left amazingly unscathed. Nine of the rest were slightly wounded, while another sixteen, more seriously. That left sixty you recalled, that were dead.

Oh, it was a top show alright, but there was evidence, unfortunate and nasty even in your eyes. Bodies, blood and guts and gore and bone splinters all over the place, and of all the times to choose, came then the equally good Her Majesty's Ship Rosario just on the horizon. Back over the side they went! The sixty dead, the gore and those worst sixteen wounded, the latter bound and trussed soundly of course. Oh a bit of turbulence, a bit of writhing and thrashing and gurgling in the water for a while, but then, good old Jaws. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Brand New Sydney Opera House (after Harrison)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.