STRAIGHT TALK: Terrorism and Resistance

By Qader, Abdul | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, March 31, 1998 | Go to article overview

STRAIGHT TALK: Terrorism and Resistance


Qader, Abdul, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


STRAIGHT TALK: Terrorism and Resistance

Can we believe the Zionist claim that they condemn terrorism and violence? If true, it would mean the collapse of the very Zionist ideology and all its justifications for existence, since it relies basically on terrorism.

So, we must be extremely cautious of the latest Zionist attempts to persuade us to issue "joint" statements. The idea obviously is to use such statements as a weapon to crush the legitimate resistance movements of the people of Palestine, Lebanon and others and to condemn their struggle in defense of the usurped rights.

INVITATIONS DECLINED

Dr. Muhammad Sayyid Tantawi, rector of Al-Azhar University, acted commendably when he refused to issue with the chief rabbi of Israel a joint communiqué denouncing terrorism. The rabbi had suggested that when they they met in Cairo a few days ago. The rector also declined an official invitation from the rabbi to visit Israel.

Sheikh Tantawi represents one of the important platforms of Islam. It does not befit this platform to get involved in supporting the claims of Israel. Al-Azhar has served in the past as a strong fortress against the enemies of Islam, battling for truth, defending oppressed peoples and fighting oppressors. It remains so now and, God willing, will remain so forever.

The rabbi's visit to Egypt had drawn harsh criticism from political and religious circles. Some Egyptian newspapers led a campaign against it and reproached the rector for receiving the rabbi. They felt that it would provide Israel with propaganda material and improve its image in the Arab and Muslim world.

The chief rabbi of Israel is not a man of peace to be honored, said the Al-Yaum daily. He was notorious for his extremist views against Islam and Arabs and for his opposition to the peace process, the daily said and added that he was in the forefront of those who demanded a halt to the handing over of any land seized by Israeli occupation forces. …

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