Israeli-Palestinian Peace Negotiations Discussed in San Francisco

By Pasquini, Elaine | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, June 3, 2000 | Go to article overview

Israeli-Palestinian Peace Negotiations Discussed in San Francisco


Pasquini, Elaine, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN PEACE NEGOTIATIONS DISCUSSED IN SAN FRANCISCO

Hassan Abdel Rahman, chief representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization and the Palestinian Authority in the U.S.; Daniel Shek, consul general of Israel in San Francisco; and Rajendra Abyankar, consul general of India in San Francisco, discussed the Middle East peace process at the San Francisco World Affairs Council April 6.

Referring to the previous negotiations as "brainstorming," Abdel Rahman said, "It's time we get down to business... We have stormed our brains enough." He said failure of the two sides to reach agreement quickly on even a framework of the issues will have a negative impact on the peace process, and delay the Sept. 13 target date for resolution of the dispute.

"If there is a will on the Israeli side, we can reach an agreement," he stated. The Palestinian position, he clarified, is that "the Israelis withdraw to the 1967 borders in accordance with U.N. Resolutions 242 and 338." Recognizing that the Israelis and Palestinians are destined to live together, they must live as equals, he said, and "not as the occupier and the occupied--not as master and slave.

"We do not like the heavy Israeli foot on our neck," he explained. "The time of colonialism is over." He described the humiliating checkpoints which sometimes prevent Palestinians from reaching Israeli hospitals for medical treatment during an emergency. "We don't like checkpoints and to be dealt with as foreigners in our country," he said.

"Since the Palestinians have conceded 77 percent of historic Palestine to the Israelis, leaving the Palestinians with only 23 percent" consisting of Gaza and the West Bank, he said, "no Palestinian leader alive today will give more." Further, he said, "The 1967 borders have to be respected, including Jerusalem." Nor can Jerusalem "be exclusive to any group," he continued. "It must be an open city for all faiths."

He believes Jerusalem should not be redivided, but that it should be the shared capital of both Israel and Palestine. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Israeli-Palestinian Peace Negotiations Discussed in San Francisco
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.