CPAP Examines Future of Muslim and Arab World

By Lehman, Wendy | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, June 3, 2000 | Go to article overview

CPAP Examines Future of Muslim and Arab World


Lehman, Wendy, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


CPAP EXAMINES FUTURE OF MUSLIM AND ARAB WORLD

In an April 27 review of more than a century of Zionism culminating in the creation and development of Israel, Abdel Latef Arabiat, secretary-general of the Islamic Action Front (IAF), asked what the future will hold for the Arab and Muslim world. Speaking at the Center for Policy Analysis on Palestine in Washington, DC, Arabiat cited the first Zionist Congress in 1897, and such subsequent developments as the Balfour Declaration, the various Arab-Israeli wars, and the "peace process" starting with the Israeli-Egyptian agreement in 1979. Challenging the idea that the Arabs have gained from "normalization" of relations with Israel, he focused instead on the importance of unity in the Arab and Muslim world.

Arabiat, formerly the secretary-general of Jordan's Ministry of Education and speaker of Jordan's parliament from 1990-1993, argued that instead of concentrating so much on Israel, the Arabs should place more emphasis on seeking their rights and in achieving solidarity. In an attempt to help reach this goal, Arabiat is involved in a coalition of divergent political groups from the communist, nationalist, and Islamist streams. He argued that this was the only such coalition in the Arab world.

To demonstrate the value of national unity, he pointed to the strong cultural and historical role the Arab world played, particularly prior to being divided arbitrarily by colonialism. "We were, in the past, a nation," he said. Now he views Israel as a "foreign body" which was "injected" into the Middle East. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

CPAP Examines Future of Muslim and Arab World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.