Clinton or Dole: Who's Best for Middle East Peace? A "Yellow Dog" Democrat against Clinton in 1996

By Killgore, Andrew I. | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, September 3, 1996 | Go to article overview

Clinton or Dole: Who's Best for Middle East Peace? A "Yellow Dog" Democrat against Clinton in 1996


Killgore, Andrew I., Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Clinton or Dole: Who's Best for Middle East Peace? A "Yellow Dog" Democrat Against Clinton in 1996

When the bumper sticker, "Clinton and Gore Out in Four," appeared around Washington two years ago Bill Clinton, on a personal level, had begun to lose this Southern "yellow dog" Democrat. Hardly imaginable was a president so lacking in personal dignity and "mystique" that he would be asked, as he had been, what kind of underwear he wore. Even more unthinkable was a president who would actually answer such a question, as Clinton in fact did.

Personal failings already appearing in 1994 look even worse today. It is virtually certain by now that Clinton has run around on his wife, so egregiously that she could not but know of it and feel the humiliation of knowing that others knew. He almost surely has cheated three times to the level of actual fraud on his income taxes, and paid up later only because congressional hearings on other matters revealed his cheating. His choice of friends and business associates reveals a near "instinct" for comer-cutters, as we see some of them already convicted of felonies and others indicted by a special prosecutor and under trial in court.

President Clinton might have been seen as the traditional South's go-between to bridge the layers of the region's conservative and hierarchical social system. But he lacked the integrity to be seen as a patron. Instead, disguised as just another Southern "bubba," relaxed and easy-going on the outside, Clinton is so fiercely driven by ambition on the inside that he is essentially unaware of or uncaring about ethical and moral boundaries. A political chameleon on this year's electoral landscape, he is a latter-day reincarnation of the ancient Greek sea god, Proteus, who could assume any shape that offered advantage.

But it is not primarily personal disappointment in fellow Southerner Clinton that makes it impossible for me to vote for him this November. Rather it is that he has tied his fate to the uniquely corrupting Israel Lobby, which not only degrades politics in this country, but taints intellectual life and media integrity as well.

More than 100 deceptively named political action committees under the aegis of AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee), which lobbies in Washington for Israel, buy or intimidate Congress into providing Israel more than five billion dollars in grants and loan guarantees every year. A compliant media covers the clear violations of electoral law by these PACs and shuts off debate by blasting critics of Israel and its American lobby as anti-Semites or, if they are Jewish, as self-hating Jews. Israel's essential contempt for Clinton, and by implication for the United States as a whole, is such that one Israeli newspaper referred to the president as "Israel's lapdog."

It is clear that under Clinton no balance on the Arab-Israel issue that would help U.S. interests can be expected. Rather, an all-consuming pro-Israel bias will continue to cast its shadow on America's relations with the Arab and Muslim worlds and continue to endanger the safety and lives of American diplomats and soldiers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clinton or Dole: Who's Best for Middle East Peace? A "Yellow Dog" Democrat against Clinton in 1996
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.