Arab Americans Protest FBI Investigations

By Willford, Catherine M. | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, February 1991 | Go to article overview

Arab Americans Protest FBI Investigations


Willford, Catherine M., Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


According to The Washington Post, the Federal Bureau of Investigation conducted interviews with more than 200 Arab-American business and community leaders during January to protect Arab Americans from any backlash associated with the Gulf crisis and to "gather intelligence about potential terrorist threats." Though the FBI described the measure as "precautionary," and stated that it is not assuming that Arab Americans are aware of or involved in criminal activity, Arab-American and civil liberties organizations were angered and offended by the Justice Department probe. "This is shades of the Japanese-American experience of World War II," stated ADC President Albert Mokhiber. "We find it to be quite offensive; it is, in effect, being dubbed a suspect class."

Arab American Institute Director James Zogby rejected the Japanese-American parallel as inappropriate because, he said, contemporary Arab-American society is "not isolatable." Nevertheless, he harshly criticized the action: "Remember, this is the same FBI that brought us ABSCAM, the LA 8 and investigations into the personal lives of community members during the Lebanon war," Zogby said, "Assuming that they want to protect us is like expecting the fox to guard the chickens. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Arab Americans Protest FBI Investigations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.