The Grafter's Shack

By Puett, J. Morgan | Art Journal, Spring 2004 | Go to article overview

The Grafter's Shack


Puett, J. Morgan, Art Journal


A GENERATED@WAVEHILL INSTALLATION FOR WAVE HILL'S HERBERT AND HYONJA ABRONS WOODLAND

July 14 - October 27, 2002

The Grafter's Shack is a tribute to the individual beekeeper and the art of beekeeping, which has been passed through four generations of the Puett family. In this project, J. Morgan Puett explores the compelling history of bee grafting and the rich lore and symbolism associated with bees. Her southern, agricultural background has been a strong influence in her work, but this is the first project that both engages her family members as collaborators and collectively explores their past. Her sister Barry Puett, a beekeeper/lawyer, did a bee grafting performance at the opening in july to produce a Wave Hill queen. Garnett Puett, an artist/ beekeeper, spoke about the ecological and economic issues facing the contemporary beekeeper. Lake Puett, an independent journalist, contributed an essay recalling the inspiration for this project, their father's grafting shack in Hahira, Georgia.

"Queen grafting, a highly specialized aspect of beekeeping, is the skillful process of producing queens which involves removing larvae just hatched from the egg of the best queen. Next, each little grub is picked up with an earspoon and gently laid in a cell cup filled with royal jelly food. This practice normally happens before the honey flow begins, when the bees are "building up." Every bee larva has the potential to become a qu e en if properly nourished by its hivermates or an apiarist."*

Walking along the woodland path, visitors come across this vernacular structure. Sheltered in a grove of pine trees, it appears to have always been here to tend Wave Hill's hives. The doors open to reveal the grafter's workplace which contain the tools, books, supplies, and idiosyncratic apparatuses customized by the keeper to perform her craft. The walls are papered with book pages from The Life of a Bee, by Mauri ce Maeterlinck, and The ABC and XYZ of Bee Culture, by A. I. Root. These are applied to the wall with a thin layer of bees' wax.

Among the items in the shack are a custom-designed beekeeper's veil that is embroidered with the reproductive system of the queen bee and a white jumpsuit inscribed with bee grafting instructions, wisdom, and lore.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Grafter's Shack
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.