The Correlation between Intimacy and Objective Similarity in Interpersonal Relationships

By Wakimoto, Shinobu; Fujihara, Takehiro | Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal, January 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Correlation between Intimacy and Objective Similarity in Interpersonal Relationships


Wakimoto, Shinobu, Fujihara, Takehiro, Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal


The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between interpersonal intimacy and objective similarity of behavioral tendency. Sixty pairs were measured for the intimacy by Rubin's (1970) Love and Liking scale and objective similarity of behavioral tendency by Tuzuki's (1964) TestDELB(Bform). ANOVA of similarity score indicated a significant main effect of gender make up. The similarity score (measured similarities between the 2 persons) of male-male pairs were higher than male-female pairs. A significant positive correlation between similarity score and liking and the perceived similarity factor was observed for the female of male-female pairs.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between interpersonal intimacy and objective similarity of behavioral tendency focusing on the differences of gender combination of interpersonal relationship. Many researchers have pointed out familiarity, reciprocity of attraction, similarity, and physical attractiveness as the determinants of intimacy or attraction in interpersonal relationship (Berscheid & Reis, 1998; Huston & Levinger, 1978). Among them, much research has been conducted on similarities of attitude and personality as the major determinants of the formation of interpersonal intimacy. For example, by a longitudinal study, Newcomb (1961) demonstrated that similarity of attitude played a major role in the formation of friendship among the house mates in a dormitory. Considering that attraction is a linear function of individuals' attitudinal similarity, Byrne and Nelson (1965), conducted extensive research based on this "bogus stranger" experimental paradigm. Concerning similarity of personality, Carli, Ganley, and Pierce-Otay (1991) reported that university students selected roommates who had similar personalities, Antill (1983) reported that married couples who had similar personalities are more satisfied with their relationship. Yoshida (1972) pointed out that not only attitude and personalities, but also self-concept, economic level, ability, physical condition, and state of emotion function as the object and dimension of similarity.

The similarity-attraction effect has been further elaborated by the evidence that contents of shared similarity interact with the individual's characteristics which influence attraction (Berscheid & Reis, 1998). For example, Jamieson, Lydon, and Zanna (1987) demonstrated that the personality variable of self-monitoring moderated the effect. In other words, for low self-monitors attitudinal similarity influenced attraction of the target person more than did similarity in preference for activities, but the reverse was true for high self-monitors. Osada, Itoh, and Funahashi (1988) demonstrated that the sex factor of the target person influenced attraction. They conducted research based on Byrne's (1965) "bogus stranger" experimental paradigm, and found that the effect of attitudinal similarity was less critical in the opposite-sex condition than in the same-sex condition. In their experiment, they manipulated only the opposite-sex condition as the independent factor of a target person and did not take the same-sex condition into consideration. On the other hand, as Osada et al. (1988) suggested, it is quite possible that a combination of the sex of the subject and that of the target person may influence the correlation between similarity and intimacy.

We are able to summarize the pitfalls of the past studies on intimacy and similarity as follows. Firstly, much research focused only on the short-term impression formation as seen in Byrne's (1965) experimental paradigm. Secondly, they measured only a unidimensional response level, (e.g., liking or disliking.) Thirdly, they dealt only with attitude and personality similarities. Accordingly, this study aims to measure the loving as well as the liking dimension by targeting those people who have already established a long-term interpersonal relationship, such as close friends and lovers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Correlation between Intimacy and Objective Similarity in Interpersonal Relationships
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.