Erasmus in the Twentieth Century: Interpretations C. 1920-2000

By DeMolen, Richard L. | The Catholic Historical Review, January 2004 | Go to article overview

Erasmus in the Twentieth Century: Interpretations C. 1920-2000


DeMolen, Richard L., The Catholic Historical Review


Erasmus in the Twentieth Century: Interpretations c. 1920-2000. By Bruce Mansfield. (Toronto: University of Toronto Press. 2003. Pp. xiv, 324. $70.00.)

The title of this monograph by Professor Emeritus Bruce Mansfield is misleading because it is a survey of works about Erasmus of Rotterdam from 1936 to 2000 rather than, as the title indicates, from 1920 to 2000. As such it is not a chronological sequel to Mansfield's two earlier volumes on interpretations of Erasmus which cover the periods 1550 to 1750 (Toronto, 1979) and 1750 to 1920 (Toronto, 1992). The present volume is both cursory and incomplete within the examined time frame because it ignores important studies by Margaret Aston, Irena Backus, A. G. Dickens, and Richard Marius-to name but a few.

Mansfield appears to be aware of the lacunae by noting that this volume is of "a different character" (p. ix). The two earlier volumes in his trilogy were "as much interested (or nearly so) in the writers on Erasmus, their social positions, intellectual moorings, religious convictions, and stances in contemporary controversies, as in Erasmus himself" (p. ix). Mansfield chose not to pursue this same critical examination of authors in his final volume because "it is misleading to give them too specific a scholarly, let alone an ideological, character. The result of all this is that the material here is organized, not (as in the previous volumes) by the ideologies and commitments of the writers, but thematically" (p. x).

As a result of Mansfield's change of direction, the present volume suffers from a lack of chronological progression. he attempts to lump together various authors from different generations (see chapters 2,3, 5, and 6) but does not note inconsistencies. Mansfield himself admits that "authors are drawn into the discussion as they illustrate these [themes] or advance them" (p. x). More seriously, Mansfield admits that he has not "achieved, or perhaps even attempted, even-handed justice" in drawing his conclusions (p. x) and that he has attempted "to elucidate themes and make progress towards a personal, synthetic view" (p. x). In my opinion, Mansfield is particularly severe with Professor E. V Teile's scholarship.

Mansfield also derails any attempt to achieve comprehensiveness in his work by giving special attention to three Erasmus commemorations, namely, in 1936 (400th anniversary of Erasmus' death), 1967-1970 (500th anniversary of Erasmus' birth), and 1986 (450th anniversary of Erasmus' death) and the published articles that resulted from them. …

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