A Social History of the Cloister: Daily Life in the Teaching Monasteries of the Old Regime

By Bergin, Joseph | The Catholic Historical Review, January 2004 | Go to article overview

A Social History of the Cloister: Daily Life in the Teaching Monasteries of the Old Regime


Bergin, Joseph, The Catholic Historical Review


A Social History of the Cloister: Daily Life in the Teaching Monasteries of the Old Regime. By Elizabeth Rapley. [McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Religion.] (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press. 2001. Pp. xv, 378. $49.95.)

Professor Rapley's previous book, the Devotes, focused on the new forms of the 'religious' life which were created by, and for, women in seventeenth-century France. Based on extensive archival research, it established her as a major historian of a massive but still badly understood phenomenon, the explosion of convent life in the century following the French wars of religion. Her new book expands on her previous research, and offers an ambitious survey of the social life of French convents belonging to three of the new teaching congregations that emerged on either side of 1600 in the heady days of the Catholic Reformation. Her survey ends in the very different circumstances of the French Revolution, when convents were closed down by force and some of their inmates were summarily executed for expressing nostalgia for the good old days. In between, Professor Rapley's fourteen chapters cover a great deal of ground, ensuring that her work will surely establish itself as an essential reference for historians of women, education, and religious experience in early modern France. The congregations that she has examined are the Ursulines and the less well-known Compagnie de Marie Notre-Dame and Congregation de Notre-Dame, whose geographical distribution throughout France differed considerably. Unfortunately, the author has not provided a map of the many convents she cites throughout the book, leaving the reader bereft of a sense of space and the possible connections and/or overlap between these conventual foundations.

That is a minor quibble, though, as the book as a -whole impresses by its extensive archival foundations and the range of issues it deals with. It uses material from the three congregations to engage in a general study of French convents over two centuries, an approach which reassures the reader as to the evidential basis of her discussions of general historiographical issues, while these latter are in turn constantly tested with reference to the data she has unearthed about the life-cycles of the three congregations. …

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