We're Rooted Here and They Can't Pull Us Up: Essays in African Canadian Women's History

By Watson, Beatrice | Herizons, Fall 1995 | Go to article overview

We're Rooted Here and They Can't Pull Us Up: Essays in African Canadian Women's History


Watson, Beatrice, Herizons


WE'RE ROOTED HERE AND THEY CAN'T PULL US UP: ESSAYS IN AFRICAN CANADIAN. WOMEN'S HISTOR

Six black scholars-Dionne Brand, Linda Carty, Afua P. Cooper, Sylvia Hamilton and Peggy Bristow-pieced together this study on the role of black women in Canadian history to break the myth that black people have been rooted in the Canadian mosaic for more than 300 years. The title is borrowed from a quote by Harriet Tubman and was stumbled upon by Adrienne Shadd in her research on Tubman's life. Tubman, denouncing the 19th colonization back-to-Africa movement, is quoted as comparing Blacks to a field of onions and garlic that cannot easily be uprooted. She said, "Whites had brought black people here to do their drudgery and now they were trying to root them out and send back to Africa. But they can't do it. We're rooted here and they can't pull us up." History has proved her right.

The authors offer a fresh analysis of African Canadian history and attempt to fill the gap which excludes the contributions Blacks have made to the social and economic development of this country. The book is woman-centred and shows how race and sex still impact on block women's lives.

The papers in this collection of essays offer a unique perspective of black people in Canada from their arrival in the 17th Century to the immediate postwar period. Most of the materials in these works were drawn from primary sources. There are elaborate quotes, full letters and other writings that draw the reader intimately into the lives of the subjects, allowing us to experience vicariously the tension, the pain and the every day as they confronted racism from a people who thought little of Blacks and didn't accord them the dignity that was human to have.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

We're Rooted Here and They Can't Pull Us Up: Essays in African Canadian Women's History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.