Cole's Notes: Hall, a Passageway to Bigger Things

By G, Susan | Herizons, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

Cole's Notes: Hall, a Passageway to Bigger Things


G, Susan, Herizons


I used to hate high school proms and everything about them. As a high school student in the 60s, I found them regressive exercises in heterosexual coupledom, though, okay, I wouldn't have said it that way -- I didn't even know I was a lesbian.

At my high school, we cancelled our prom and produced an arts festival instead. Then, as the 70s descended, student councils developed more and more elaborate ways of partying at springtime. No longer did you have to eat bad snacks in the cafeteria! High schools took the festivities out of the school and into fancy hotels and limos.

Then along comes Marc Hall, the gay teen graduating from Monsignor John Pereyma Catholic High School in Oshawa. He wanted to take his boyfriend to the prom. The Catholic School Board said no, and suddenly going to the prom became a radical act of defiance.

Two things about the case strike me as important indicators of the direction queer and feminist politics are headed -- one points to what could turn into an intense constitutional crisis that could have an impact on all women's lives, the other underlines the pure power that goes with publicly coming out.

From the moment he made his announcement that he was suing the Durham Separate School Board for sex discrimination, Marc Hall looked like a guy who had been ready for this moment for a long time. Charming, articulate and direct, he responded to the avalanche of attention -- and support -- with a poise that was awesome.

In his hometown of Oshawa, 30 minutes outside of Toronto, he'd found a boyfriend and a few gay friends, but he'd never found a community. He had no way of knowing that his simple demand would galvanize EGALE (Equality for Gays and Lesbians Everywhere) and The Ontario English Catholic Teachers Association, to say nothing of gay activists across the country.

Marc Hall had never been to Toronto's Church Street, home of one of the largest and most powerful queer communities on the planet. Even in the new millennium and wired up online, he'd never connected. His prom set the stage for what promises to be a monumental legal battle. Marc Hall won an injunction that allowed him to take his boyfriend to the prom, but the substantive case has only just started heating up. There's no question that it will end up in the Supreme Court.

When it does, the battle between gay rights and religious institutions' rights will blow up into huge proportions. It could have an impact on the funding of separate schools, and the future of Ontario's Separate School Board and could even go so far as to question the board's right to maintain discriminatory values under the banner of `freedom of religion. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cole's Notes: Hall, a Passageway to Bigger Things
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.