Enlarging the Frame

By Bolin, Paul E. | Art Education, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Enlarging the Frame


Bolin, Paul E., Art Education


This issue of the journal marks the completion of my tenure as Editor ofArt Education. It has been an enjoyable and enlightening two years that I have served in this capacity. I trust that during my editorship there have been ideas within the pages of the journal which have both challenged and confirmed your educational beliefs and actions. I was recently asked how I felt about being a journal editor now that my term in this position was drawing to a close. In a reflective response to this question,

I replied that I see my time as Editor somewhat like being the parent of a young child: the years pass quickly but the nights can sometimes seem very long. So too, as an editor and a parent, the extended nights and swiftly-moving years are often filled with many satisfying rewards.

I am passing on to a new Editor the opportunity to experience a series of satisfying rewards (and a few long nights). I am pleased to leave Art Education in the extremely capable and experienced hands of Pat Villeneuve. Pat has assisted me for two years as Coordinator of Instructional Resources for the journal and for the past year as Associate Editor. Her sensitivity for people and knowledge of issues in art education, along with her fine attention to detail, will add a strong dimension to the journal. I am looking forward to reading her work.

I would like to thank the many people who have collaborated during my tenure to make each issue of the journal possible. The journal's Editorial Board and Review Panel have been excellent These individuals are the backbone of this publication; their insights shown while reviewing manuscripts have been a tremendous help. Lynn Ezell and her publication staff at the NASA offices have been outstanding.

I appreciate the assistance and encouragement of the Executive Board of the National Art Education Association. I also thank my administrators, colleagues, and staff atThe Pennsylvania State University for their support; a special note of regard goes to my Editorial Assistant at Penn State, Huei-Ling Chao. Finally, and very importantly, I offer my thanks to you, members of the National Art Education Association and readers of Art Education. I appreciate your outstanding and tireless efforts to educate others about the value and significance of art within their lives and the surrounding world.

I selected articles for this issue of the journal in my continued attempt to enlarge the frame of art education. Our field must visualize and actively assume an increasingly significant role in expanding the purpose, practice, and presence of art education within education and society. We must continue to rupture the social and educational expectations and boundaries that now define how we view our field and carry out activities within it Concluding my issues as editor of the journal, I have selected the following articles to challenge current expectations of what art education is and can be.

Kristin Congdon begins this issue of the journal by discussing the use of recycled materials within art and art education. …

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