History-Social Science Instructional Materials

By Adams, Thomas | Social Studies Review, Spring 2004 | Go to article overview

History-Social Science Instructional Materials


Adams, Thomas, Social Studies Review


California through its lists of adopted instructional materials for kindergarten through grade eight has brought about Standards-based reform in the classroom. By reviewing instructional materials according to the Standards, curriculum Frameworks, and criteria for evaluation, the state of California adopts instructional programs or puts them on a list of state-approved materials that allows school districts to use state funds. The first round of Standards-based adoptions was between 1999 and 2002 when the state of California conducted five adoptions in four years: history-social science in 1999, special adoptions of mathematics and language arts in 1999, science in 2000, mathematics in 2001, and reading/ language arts in 2002. The next round of Standards-based adoptions will occur between 2005 and 2008 and once again there will be five adoptions in four years but with the addition of visual and performing arts: history-social science in 2005, science in 2006, visual and performing arts in 2006, mathematics in 2007, and reading/language arts in 2008. The focus of this article will be on the upcoming 2005 history-social science adoption and the criteria that will be used for evaluating materials.

The State Board of Education adopted "Criteria for Evaluating Instructional Materials History-Social Science: Kindergarten through Grade Eight" in January 2003, available at http://www.cde.ca.gov/cflr. Under Education Code section 60200(c)(6),criteria must be issued at least 30 months prior to action by the State Board of Education. Noteworthy is that the criteria for Standards-based adoptions have followed a similar format of five categories: content/alignment with Standards, program organization, assessment, universal access, and instructional planning and support. In Standards-based adoptions, the category of content/alignment with Standards is the gatekeeper. Materials that are not aligned Standards are not adopted. The categories for the 2005 history-social science adoption criteria will be following the format found in other Standards-based adoptions but have been shaped to according the needs of the subject area:

1. History-Social Science Content/Alignment with Standards: The content as specified in the Education Code, the History-Social Science Content Standards, and the History.Social Science Framework (2001 Updated Edition)

2. Program Organization: The sequence and organization of the history-social science program

3. Assessment: The strategies presented in the instructional materials for measuring what students know and are able to do

4. Universal Access: Instructional materials that are understandable to all students, including students eligible for special education, English learners, and students whose achievement is either below or above that typical of the class or grade level

5. Instructional Planning and Support: The instructional planning and support information and materials, typically including a separate edition specially designed for use by teachers in implementing the History-Social Science Content Standards and History-Social Science Framework

The role of these categories is explicitly stated and the emphasis, as in other subject areas, is on content: "To be adopted, materials must first meet in full Category 1, History-Social Science Content/Alignment with Standards. Materials will be evaluated holistically in the other categories of Program Organization, Assessment, Universal Access, and Instructional Planning and Support." Category 1 has the important role of ensuring that instructional materials have the necessary Standards-aligned content. Because of its importance, History-Social Science Content/Alignment with Standards invites greater discussion.

Standards

There are twenty-five elements list under the category of content. These different elements may be grouped in the following way: Standards, Framework, geography and ecology, economics, civics, religion, local option, and accuracy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

History-Social Science Instructional Materials
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.