Factors Predictive of Adolescents' Intentions to Use Birth Control Pills, Condoms, and Birth Control Pills in Combination with Condoms

By Craig, Dorothy M; Wade, Karen E et al. | Canadian Journal of Public Health, September/October 2000 | Go to article overview

Factors Predictive of Adolescents' Intentions to Use Birth Control Pills, Condoms, and Birth Control Pills in Combination with Condoms


Craig, Dorothy M, Wade, Karen E, Allison, Kenneth R, Irving, Hyacinth M, et al., Canadian Journal of Public Health


ABSTRACT

Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1988) as a conceptual framework, 705 secondary school students were surveyed to identify their intentions to use birth control pills, condoms, and birth control pills in combination with condoms. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that the theory explained between 23.596 and 45.8% of the variance in intentions. Variables external to the model such as past use, age, and ethnicity exhibited some independent effects. Attitudes were consistently predictive of intentions to use condoms, pills, and condoms in combination with pills for both male and female students. However, there were differences by gender in the degree to which subjective norms and perceived behavioural control predicted intentions. The findings suggest that programs should focus on: creation of positive attitudes regarding birth control pills and condoms; targeting important social influences, particularly regarding males' use of condoms; and developing strategies to increase students' control over the use of condoms.

ABREGE

La theorie du comportement axe sur un objectif (Ajzen, 1988) a servi de cadre de travail conceptuel pour mener un Bondage aupres de 705 etudiants at l'ecole secondaire visant at connaitre leurs intentions concernant (utilisation de la pilule anticonceptionnelle, du condom ou des deux methodes combinees. L'analyse de variance avec regression hierarchique a revele que la theorie expliquait entre 23,5 % et 45,8 % de la variance dans les intentions. Les variables exterieures au modele comme l'utihsation qu'ils en ont fait dans le passE, (age et le groupe ethnique ont rev& des effets independants. Les attitudes etaient previsibles tant chez les fifles que chez les garnons quant a (intention d'utiliser soit le condom, la pilule anticonceptionnelle ou bien une combina-ison des deux. Cependant, on a note des differences selon le sexe concernant la subjectivity des normes et la perception de contr6le des comportements des intentions prevues. Les conclusions indiquent que les programmes devraient s'attarder at: developper des attitudes positives au sujet de la pilule anticonceptionnelle et du condom; wiser les influences sociales importantes, en particulier en ce qui a trait a (utilisation du condom chez les hommes; et mettre au point des strategies pour accroitre la maitrise des etudiants pour ce qui est de (utilisation du condom.

Surveys in Canada and the United States have shown evidence of high levels of sexual activity among adolescents and young adults, with increasing rates by age. 1-4 According to the Canada Youth and AIDS study, 31% of males and 29% of females in grade nine have had sexual intercourse at least once.' Furthermore, several studies suggest that many are not using condoms or are using them inconsistently.1,25-10 Also, studies have noted that young people tend to use condoms for contraception rather than protection against STDs11-13 and to not use condoms when taking oral contraceptives.13,14 This is of concern because unprotected sexual activity poses serious health threats for youth, including sexually transmitted diseases, HIV infection, and unplanned pregnancy.2,15,16

The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB)17 was used as the conceptual framework for the study reported here. This theory, which is an extension of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA),18 suggests that a specific behaviour is a function of an individual's intention to perform that behaviour. Intention is a function of attitude towards the behaviour, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control. In turn, attitude is a function of the belief that performing the behaviour leads to certain outcomes and the evaluation of these outcomes. Subjective norm is a function of the beliefs that important referents value the performance of a particular behaviour and the motivation to comply with the referents. Perceived behavioural control, which refers to the ease or difficulty of performing a behaviour, is influenced by internal factors such as information, skills, and emotions, as well as external factors such as dependence on others.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Factors Predictive of Adolescents' Intentions to Use Birth Control Pills, Condoms, and Birth Control Pills in Combination with Condoms
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.