Music in Education

Musical Opinion, May/June 2004 | Go to article overview

Music in Education


Come and Play, the national music making initiative, is celebrating the award of £582,454 extra funding from Youth Music. Initially designed for two years, Come and Play will now be able to offer children access to music for a third year.

Following its initial successes Come and Play intends to reach a further 17 areas making an amazing total of 47 areas throughout the UK over the three years. When it is finished, Come and Play will have offered 10,000 children from out of school clubs across the country the opportunities to emulate their musical idols and learn all about music in a fun and exciting informal environment.

For more information on Youth Music please visit www.youthmusic.org.uk or contact 020 7902 1060 or email to info@youthmusic.org.uk

The Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music is to produce a new online music education resource. Over the next 18 months, the Associated Board will be developing an interactive digital learning tool for music education called SoundWorlds. The project is aimed primarily at young people aged 13 to 18 and will be freely available on the internet and on a CDRom.

SoundWorlds will open up new opportunities for discovering, exploring and creating music. Users can navigate deep into musical sound worlds, stepping into the music itself to hear how it comes together, how it is inspired, is built and evolves. They will be able to interact with real sounds and musicians, learning how to make music, forging connections between different cultures and branching out into new kinds of music.

Although aimed at young people aged 13 to 18, SoundWorlds will also appeal to adults of all ages and to younger children. Within this audience will be those with no musical education or experience, beyond listening to music, and those who already have several years of training. A more detailed outline of the SoundWorlds project is available at www. abrsin.org/news

The Yehudi Menuhin International Competition for Young Violinists has announced the junior prize-winners: 1st Prize of £3,500 donated by Celia & Conrad Blakey was awarded to Joel C. Link along with the Chamber Music Award worth £200 donated by Peter Biddulph. 2nd Prize of £2,000 sponsored by Eclipse TD (UK) Ltd was awarded to Danbi Um. The Shared 3rd Prize of £1,250 each donated by Christoph Landon Rare Violins & Prof Curtis Price went to Ray Chen and Yoo Jin Jang. 5th Prize of £750 donated by Zamira & Jonathan Menuhin Benthall went to Esther Kim.

The HSBC Education Trust has announced a donation of £60,000 to Trinity College of Music. This launches a new three year partnership between Trinity College of Music, HSBC and the Isle of Dog's Community Foundation for Trinity's 'Isle of Dogs Music' regeneration project. Gavin Henderson, Trinity Principal adds, "Thanks to the support, Trinity can provide musicians, instruments and expertise to make inspiring, colourful music-making part of Island life.

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