Raiders & Blockaders: The American Civil War Afloat / USS New Ironsides in the Civil War

By Rowe, Wayne J. | Naval War College Review, Autumn 2000 | Go to article overview

Raiders & Blockaders: The American Civil War Afloat / USS New Ironsides in the Civil War


Rowe, Wayne J., Naval War College Review


Still, William N., Jr., John M. Taylor, and Norman C. Delaney. Raiders er Blockaders: The American Civil War Afloat. New York: Brassey's, 1998. 263pp. $16.95

Roberts, William H. USS New Ironsides in the Civil War. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1999. 209pp. $49.95

Mention of the American Civil War invokes images preserved for us by Matthew Brady-the encampments, the battlefields, and the aftereffects of the battle-in short, images of conflict on land. Somewhere in our education we viewed the portraits of famous generals like Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, who led Confederate and Union armies. We studied the major battles of Gettysburg and Antietam, and the surrender at Appomattox. We were made to understand the moral struggles confronted by President Abraham Lincoln and the reasons for his Emancipation Proclamation. The works of many fine authors have chronicled all these events. Yet rare is the mention of naval action. An avid reader of the war may be able to identify the four most famous naval battles (Mobile Bay, New Orleans, the battle between the ironclads USS Monitor and CSS Virginia, and the engagement between the USS Kearsarge and CSS Alabama), but little thereafter. Until recently there has been a lack of research on this topic, but within the last two years, new attention has been given to the U.S. Navy and the Civil War. Raiders & Blockaders: The American Civil War Afloat is an excellent primer of Civil War naval history. While its depth of material is good, it is its breadth that makes it stand out.

Three dedicated Civil War naval historians have written nineteen essays for this collection. Thoroughly researched and well documented, these accounts take the reader from the lively action of major battles to the details of small engagements; from the vivid accounts of famous admirals to tales of the average sailor. Each is written and illustrated in a style that is easy and enjoyable to read. Fifteen essays have appeared elsewhere, in the Naval War College Review, Civil War Times Illustrated, and America's Civil War. While all the famous men and their engagements have been included, it is the mention of little-known facts, perhaps about the Confederate ironclad CSS S Louisiana or the feisty Union admiral Louis Goldsborough, that sets this book apart from others.

Bernard Brodie, eminent scholar on world politics and military policy, and thought by many to be the founder of modern strategic theory, wrote this about the Civil War: "For the first time the achievements of the industrial and scientific revolution were used on a large scale in war." "Technology Afloat," by William N. Still, Jr., the fourth essay in Raiders & Blockaders, examines how new inventions and key technologies were incorporated into naval warfare in the 1860s. Among these were the adoption of steam propulsion on warships and the developments in naval ordnance, such as shell guns, improvements in interior ballistics, rifling, and the transition to breech loading. …

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