Diversity and Innovation: Management Research in Ireland at the Start of a New Millennium

By Gunnigle, P.; Morley, M. et al. | IBAR, January 1, 2000 | Go to article overview

Diversity and Innovation: Management Research in Ireland at the Start of a New Millennium


Gunnigle, P., Morley, M., Monks, K., Walsh, J. S., IBAR


Introduction

This volume of Irish Business and Administrative Research (!BAR) represents a very significant development in management research in Ireland. Based on the selected best papers from the 1999 Irish Academy of Management Conference, held at the University of Limerick, this volume represents an effective microcosm of the diversity and nature of management research in Ireland. Before delving into the substantive content of this volume, it may be useful to remind ourselves of the recent roots of the IAM and its contribution to management research and teaching in Ireland.

The Irish Academy of Management

The idea for an Irish Academy of Management (IAM) was formed in 1996 by Jim Walsh, who met Kathy Monks and Richard Harrison to discuss how such an organisation might be established. They were soon joined by colleagues from a range of third-level institutions in Ireland interested in participating in this venture. IAM is now the leading professional association for management studies research and education in Ireland. The overall aim of the IAM is to promote the advancement of research, knowledge and education in the field of organisation and management studies and, to this end, the academy has the following objectives:

To build wider appreciation and acceptance of the theory and practice of management;

* To further the development of management education;

* To provide opportunities for researchers to collaborate within and across the sub-area specialities of management;

To encourage presentation and publication of scholarly research.

The fledgling IAM held initial conferences at University College Cork (1996), hosted by Dr Jim Walsh; and Dublin City University (1997), hosted by Dr Kathy Monks. However, the formal inauguration of the Association and Annual Conference did not occur until 1998 when the first "official" IAM Conference took place at the National University of Ireland, Galway, hosted by Dr Leo Smyth. This meeting also adopted the formal IAM Constitution and witnessed the formal election of officers.

Limerick 99 was, thus, the second formal IAM Conference. This event had the largest attendance to date with 152 registered delegates. Almost every University and Institute of Technology in Ireland was represented, along with scholars from eighteen British, four Australian, three US, two New Zealand, and two "other" European Universities. In all, over 90 research papers were selected for the programme after going through a rigorous peer review process in which over 40 reviewers participated. As can be gleaned from the selected best papers in this volume, the range of papers presented at the conference was extremely diverse and covered a variety of management areas, including business policy/strategy, marketing, information technology, public policy/government, accounting, finance, human resource management, industrial relations, organisation behaviour, logistics and operations management. The 2000 Conference will take place at the Dublin Institute of Technology on September ?th and 8th and, given the current growth curve of the IAM, we can anticipate a very large number of delegates and papers.

The Role of IBAR

Given the IAM's central aim of advancing research, knowledge, and education in the field of organisation and management studies, a clear priority is the promotion and dissemination of high quality research on all aspects of management studies in Ireland. To this end, the role of a high quality journal is clearly critical. IBAR has a long and proud tradition as Ireland's leading business journal for both academics and practitioners. It is thus appropriate that the Academy views IBAR as its key vehicle for disseminating the fruits of its work to a wider audience. This volume - the first issue of MAR as the official Journal of the Irish Academy of Management - marks a major step in this process and we, as guest editors of this special edition, are honoured to be part of this development. …

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