Charlie's Letters

By Ginsberg, Ruth Bader | Texas Law Review, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Charlie's Letters


Ginsberg, Ruth Bader, Texas Law Review


Charles Alan Wright was a true giant in the law. It is hard to think of the profession without the involvement of his bright mind. Among his many talents, the great professor was a great writer of letters. My tribute to him is drawn from letters he wrote to me.1

My correspondence with Charlie Wright goes back many years. He advised me on mystery novels worth reading. We had an ongoing exchange on the fitness of the grammar book word "gender" in place of the more stirring word "sex." I sought his approval for retaining the word "shall" in the Supreme Court Rules when all other Federal Rules had succumbed to the more blunt "must."

But in the main, we corresponded about opinions on procedure, from my early years as a law teacher in the 1960s, through my tenure on the D.C. Circuit, up to the 1999-2000 Supreme Court term. My letters were typically brief, like this one from February 24, 2000. I sent Charlie an opinion released that week on the authority of a federal court of appeals to instruct the entry of judgment as matter of law and asked simply: "Did we get this one right?"2 Charlie made my day when he replied, on February 28, "What a question! Of course you got it exactly right."3 He said something more, perhaps sensing that the year had been a trying one for me as I endured a nine-month chemoradiation regimen following surgery for colorectal cancer: "You are turning out opinions at a great rate," Charlie wrote, "I hope I am right in thinking that this is a very good sign about your health."4

I will read from just one other letter, dated April 17, 1998, showing again the deeply caring side of Charlie Wright. I had written an introduction to a 1998 issue of the Texas Law Review honoring Charlie,5 and sent him a copy. Charlie wrote to me to say he was pleased and explained why. These are his words:

When Doug Laycock wrote the nice piece about me that you cite in several places, John Frank sent him a letter and sent a copy to me.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Charlie's Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.